Tinea Versicolor Diet

Tinea Versicolor And Your Diet.

What You Eat May Be Feeding Your Tinea Versicolor.

When you think of the word yeast, what comes to mind?

Do you think of food like warm, freshly baked bread? Or do you think of the discomfort associated with inconvenient bodily infections?

In truth, certain foods promote excessive yeast formation in and on the body, which in turn leads to various types of infections. And though eating these yeast-building foods doesn’t cause Tinea Versicolor (TV), their consumption can exacerbate it.

If you are one of the many struggling with TV, you know that it can be a challenging infection to contain, especially in the hotter, humid months of summer.

One reason is that TV feeds on the yeast that lives on our skin. And yeast grows rapidly in hot and humid environments.

When you consider that the human skin has approximately 3000 sweat glands, it’s easy to understand why TV can thrive in hotter months, and appear to be taking over your body.

According to TheYeastDiet.com, “Yeast overgrowth has been known to cause many symptoms including recurring yeast infections, digestive problems, gas and bloating, headaches, fatigue, frequent illness, depression, mood swings and even joint pain.”

But yeast needs certain foods to survive. By limiting consumption of yeast-promoting foods, you can limit the growth of yeast in and on your body, thus limiting the spread of yeast-related infections like Tinea Versicolor.

NOTE: You should consult your doctor before beginning any new diet. The information detailed below is for those deemed healthy enough by their doctors to eliminate yeast from their diets.

THE BAD NEWS – Common Foods To Avoid

  • ALL sweeteners, including artificial (It’s bad huh?)
  • Chocolate (By now you’re loading your gun.)
  • ALL fruits, whether fresh, dried, frozen, juice, or canned (I’m just the messenger.)
  • ALL dairy…yes, including cheese and yogurt (No, I am not a communist. Please stop calling me that.)
  • Breads containing yeast (I know…even prisoners are allowed bread.)
  • Vinegar containing condiments like mustard, mayo, salsa, and salad dressings (Oh, the inhumanity!)
  • Anything fermented. You got it…no wine either (They stopped hanging people some time ago, so put the noose away.)

THE GOOD NEWS – Common Foods To Enjoy

  • Veggies, Veggies, Veggies. The greener the better (At least you get to eat something.)
  • Uncured beef, pork, poultry, and seafood (Now you’re starting to smile again.)
  • Eggs (Yes…I said eggs.)
  • Beans (“The magical fruit.” But is a bean really a fruit?)
  • Olive oil and vegetable oil (You gotta have something on those veggies.)
  • Whole grain versions of rice, couscous, pasta, oatmeal, and pasta. (You’ll never be able to tell the difference.)

The entire list of foods to avoid and foods to enjoy would be too long to list here. Just know that by limiting the bad and feasting on the good, you will limit the growth of yeast and infection in and on your body. The result will be healthier skin and a happier you.

For more information on a yeast-free diet, visit TheYeastDiet.com

Bon Appetit!

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Comments

    • Selma
    • September 5, 2017
    Reply

    I have been dealing with 20 years of progressive chronic illness (Fibromyalgia, optic neuritis, progressive neuro sumptoms, tinea versicolor, endometriosis IV, ovarian cysts, thyroid nodules, hypothyroid, hypertension, dry eyes) about in that order.
    Despite incredible whole food organic/right living over the years. The root could also be chronic lyme disease. The TV has just gotten worse and worse over the years.
    But a couple of years ago I did a no sugar/no fruit/gluten free/dairy free/corn and soy free diet and it cleared up in 4 months. I also felt better energy, neurologically, sleep wise–though joint and muscle pain continued to get worse and got worse on the diet ( not sure if it was because I was eating more whole grains like oatmeal?).
    I slowly went back to my old ways of a little bit of natural sugar/ and fruit/ and occasional alcohol-slowly the TV came back.
    Now worse then every and my neuro symptoms are back/worse. I’m wondering is TV linked to autoimmune or immune issues?

      • Tony
      • October 15, 2017
      Reply

      Hi Selma. Thanks for contacting me.

      To learn how Tinea Versicolor is linked to your immune system, please read my article: Tinea Versicolor and Your Immune System.

    • Christian
    • August 28, 2016
    Reply

    Hi. I follow your food program. Thus selsun blue 1% will help my back and chest? I take baths twice daily using selsun.

      • Tony
      • August 31, 2016
      Reply

      Hi Christian. Thanks for contacting me.

      Although using Selsun Blue is a popular remedy, it is not even close to being the best to help your skin problem.
      If that is all you have access to, then certainly it is better than nothing at all.
      Besides being poorly effective compared to other products I mention throughout this website, I found it left my skin very dry.

        • Meena
        • May 16, 2017
        Reply

        Sorry for the typos in the last response I made- I think you could figure it out though. Another thing I disagree with is the whole grain portion of the advice above as the hull of the grain contains lots of irritating lectins as well. Want to learn more about lectins and other disrupters to your health? Again- “The Plant Paradox”

      • Meena
      • May 16, 2017
      Reply

      I’ve been dealing with tv for years now and its finally going away! I agree with most of the info above except about beans. Rubbing castor oil (now Foods brand is great) regularly (3 times per day for a few days) kills it very fast and it is all natural. The reason the castor oil works is because castor beans are full of powerful lectins (proteins that are designed to kill cells) and those lectins target yeast/fungal cells. Also- if you’re going to eat beans-
      Pressure cook them or ferment them to break apart the lectins because those lectins to the same thing to your health cells and create havoc causing cancer and auto immune issues to name a few. The most amazing book by Dr. Steven Gundry called “The Plant Paradox” is available everywhere books are sold and if you have any health issues- READ IT! It will cure you fast! His products – prebiothrive and vital reds are also absolutely amazing for feeding the good bugs inside that regulate and optimize your gut microbiome and immune system which you need to irradiate TV.

        • Tony
        • October 10, 2017
        Reply

        Hi Meena. Thanks for the information.

    • Umair
    • August 1, 2016
    Reply

    Hi Tony,
    I have no alcohol in life and no drugs and still I got affected by this pathetic TV disease. I used to sit alot on the computer (games) even in hot summers and there would be alot of humidity. I also took more than average sugar, like in tea and juices and things….fruits also, I eat alot…and milk remained my top drink.

    Now I have made things moderate, stopped playing games completely and stopped sitting in hot areas. But still I have this problem on me, although not as itchy or irritating, but sometimes when I’m driving, the back side that is affected with TV gets horrible irritation and itchy, as the pressure and heat on that area gets worse as I keep driving.

    I am not using any anti fungal soap or spray or products so far, but I think that if I can control my diet properly this thing will go away. So kindly guide me if this is possible?

      • Tony
      • August 1, 2016
      Reply

      Hi Umair. Thanks for contacting me.

      You indicate that there are positive results after modifying your diet. Congratulations.
      But I doubt that this is enough to control Tinea Versicolor.

      I am sure, if you incorporate anti-fungal treatments you will see further improvements.
      And if you really want to get serious about improving your skin condition, you would consider sanitizing your laundry.

      You are on the right “track”…you just need a few tricks in your arsenal of attack.

    • Tina
    • July 20, 2016
    Reply

    I’ve tried cutting down on wine due to this being on the “Foods to Avoid list”. I’m moving on to champagne and sake. Is this considered fermented? I get the one with the least sugar and ask for champagne that is not sweet with about 2-5 gram per serving. Are these safe drink for people with T.V.?

      • Tony
      • July 22, 2016
      Reply

      Hi Tina. Thanks for contacting me.

      Unfortunately you are not achieving any benefit by changing the maker or brand of alcohol.

    • Oliver
    • April 25, 2016
    Reply

    Hello thanks for the information. After doing some more research I have come to some conclusions which I’d like see if you agree with. Is it okay to eat sourdough bread? How about carrots? I’ve read on some sites that carrots shouldn’t be eaten when fighting candida. And from what I understand TV is a candida related issue. Thanks for your time.

      • Tony
      • April 27, 2016
      Reply

      Hi Oliver. Thanks for contacting me.

      Sourdough bread is better than white processed bread for the less sugars contained. This equates to less fungus promoting foods on your skin. And as for carrots, I’ve read the same thing as you but have no relate-able experience.

      But here’s what I can say. A very good way to discover how it effects you is to document your experience in a journal. Like a logbook. So experimenting and changing habits will uncover irrefutable results.
      See my article: Pictures of Tinea Versicolor.

      • Janet
      • June 27, 2016
      Reply

      The information was very good except Tinea Versicolor is a lipid yeast fungus which eats the oil in the sebaceous glands so the oils will make the fungus worse even though they have anti-fungal properties. A better option is to use Braggs organic apple cider vinegar and a little peroxide but you have to be careful not to burn your skin. Apply it with a cotton ball and don’t leave it on your skin long. Then if you choose, you can apply an ant-fungal cream. Take probiotics and avoid sugar and carbohydrates. Some people need the ant-fungal pills for resistant cases but you can still use the apple cider vinegar/small amount peroxide mixture. The reason for the pityairsis versicolor rash is an overgrowth of Candida in the colon caused by excessive antibiotics, cortisone shots/pills/strong cortisone cream, stress, lowered immune system probably caused by the foregoing. Heat and humidity can trigger it if there is an imbalance in your colon flora.

        • Alex
        • January 24, 2017
        Reply

        Janet,
        You are absolutely right. From my experience and research, I can only confirm that Tinea Versicolor is an internal condition / systemic candida infection. And I do believe, that you can heal it completely. I am on my way to eliminate it, but I wasn´t fully successfull yet.
        Like you said its caused by antibiotic use, stress, bad diet, lowered immune system etc.

        Diet is probably the biggest factor to manage and heal the condition. So stay away from simple sugars, and most fruits, as well as all processed crap. The list above in this article is a good overview.

        Then for external application, you can find some natural soaps which are pretty good, and have no side effects like the Art Naturals, or Purely Northwest etc.
        Also there is a spray called haole root spray, which consist of natural essential oils, enzymes, aloe etc. for smaller areas and lighter cases.

        Like always mentioned on this website, you need to look at all areas to treat the condition, and so change towels, shirts daily and besides diet and external applications, I think supplementation plays a big role. I´m yet to find the one natural solution for me. You can consider to use niacinamide (I know about one person, who treated it successfully with this), and there are a few more options.

        The one I will try next is aged garlic. I think this is the last missing point in my treatment progress, as I follow a pretty stricted diet, use supplements like vitamins, fish oils etc. daily, use the soaps and I do live a very active lifestyle (I am a professional athlete). In general I feel happy, energetic and healthy. Only my skin (tinea in the middle of my upper back, white area) is bothering me.

        As I said, I do believe you can heal it completely, as it is not meant to be there in the first place. You (your body) created it, through the above mentioned causes, so your body is for sure able to cure it as well! Keep going people!

          • Stephen
          • August 10, 2017
          Reply

          Hi Alex,

          Thanks for you post. I would really appreciate a conversation with you on this topic. Please email me at [email withheld] if you’re open to it

          Stephen

          From Tony: What do you say Alex?

          • Shonet
          • August 20, 2017
          Reply

          Hi Alex,

          I found your post very encouraging and helpful.

          I am finding it so frustrating as I am a generally healthy and active person – eats well, exercises, washes self and clothes! So, I am inclined to believe that treating it from the gut outwards will help. I have just started but I think I will reset a little with the diet, take probiotics and slow the infection down with some topical medication.

          I guess I have to be much stricter with wine and occasional chocolate! Oh dear. Honestly, I think alcohol is the biggest culprit.

          Thanks again and good luck.

    • Dee Shay
    • January 24, 2016
    Reply

    I’ve had the rash under my breasts (now spreading) for so many years and have been to doctors and tried various things to no avail. The other day I went again to a new doctor after it flared up after Christmas (lots of candy? which I usually never eat) and my regular routine of Zeasorb and Micatin spray did nothing for it. The doctor told me it was tinea versicolor and prescribed Ketoconazole. Two 200 mg tablets, to be repeated in a week.

    I took them, with juice, sweated as prescribed, left it on overnight. I don’t feel any stinging, though of course the spots are still there.

    However, I did some research and found that Ketoconazole is extremely toxic to the liver and has been banned in some countries!

    Now I’m nervous about what I’ve done to my liver and wonder if I should repeat the dose next week. I really want to see this gone.

    Will two treatments of 400mg each be very detrimental?

    And… does eating avocado really repair the liver?

    Thank you for any advice.

      • Tony
      • January 25, 2016
      Reply

      Hi Dee Shay. Thanks for contacting me.

      Ingesting anti-fungals is known to damage internal organs. That’s what lead me to search for a natural topical solution to my skin problems.

      I can’t say how much 2 treatments will adversely effect your organs…your dermatologist will be able to give you a better understanding of that.

      I personally do not know of avocado’s ability to repair the liver. Can anybody else comment on this?

        • Tina
        • March 28, 2016
        Reply

        I’ve heard N-A-C helps the liver to function.

        The only way I got TV under control was by cutting sugar and alcohol out of my diet. I lost 20 lbs after a couple months. I still eat chocolate, bread, cheese, and fermented vegetables. But it’s sparingly. And it’s only certain kinds. Like dark chocolate with under 4 grams sugar per serving. Or sourdough and whole wheat fiber breads, instead of breads with more sugar. And keeping consumption of any kind of sugar down to under 4 grams a day. No more pasta, unless it’s whole wheat.

        Also, clothing should be breathable cottons. And I use tea tree oil soaps and selenium sulfide shampoos.

          • Tony
          • April 27, 2016
          Reply

          Hi Tina. Thanks for sharing with us.

          Good advice here folks!

      • KW
      • April 25, 2016
      Reply

      This was my scenario to a “t”. My Dermatologist never let me know how toxic and damaging that pill could be! And she let me take it twice! I find my diet really has an effect on how flared up my skin is. Recently, I started drinking slim fast mixed with milk for breakfast and lunch. Bad idea. My skin has really flared up. I am going to endeavor into this Candida diet and see if it helps. I also have read that Culturelle is helpful? We shall see. Good luck to you.

    • amit
    • December 24, 2015
    Reply

    Hi…I am amit…I have very small white spots all over my body…back, chest, arm and legs..it’s very small patches of white color, sugar size . Please tell me if it is tinea versicolor or leucoderma..because my doctor told me that it’s leucoderma.

      • Tony
      • December 26, 2015
      Reply

      Hi Amit. Thank you for contacting me.

      I cannot help you personally with an accurate diagnosis of your particular case. But I can suggest that if you are dissatisfied with your doctor, or simply want another opinion, you should consult with a qualified dermatologist.

        • Raquel
        • January 14, 2016
        Reply

        He obviously can’t see a doctor for some reason, transportation, money, whatever the reason, you could have at least given him some info and left the pompous doctor attitude at home. I guess you only help who you want to help, not who needs it.

    • Jebaraj joshuva
    • December 6, 2015
    Reply

    Hello Tony,
    I’m affected by TV in last two years. lot of white patches and skin peal of problems. Currently I’m taking homeopathy treatment. Bt still increasing. How can I control my TV?

      • Tony
      • December 7, 2015
      Reply

      Hi Joshuva. Thanks for contacting me.

      Please read my article on Tinea Versicolor treatment.

      And remember, Tinea Versicolor can be managed much more effectively when you include a routine for treating your clothes and bedding laundry, together with what you eat.

    • Greta
    • November 29, 2015
    Reply

    Hi Tony,
    Thanks so much for putting this together. I have literally had TV my entire adult life, and I turn 52 tomorrow! The itching, brown and red blotches on my arms, trunk, legs, have nearly driven me insane… Not to mention the cosmetic issues. I’ve tried every remedy, body washes, medications, you name it, I’ve tried it. A month ago, I decided I was going to change my eating and exercise habits. I stopped eating anything with sugar, bread, pasta, and most grains. I’m a social drinker, and gave up my favorite craft beers, sticking to a little organic sulfate-free wine. I still enjoy my morning cup of coffee with a little half-n-half, but for the most part my diet consists of protein shakes with almond milk for breakfast, a few unsalted nuts (not peanuts) and fruit and occasional piece of good cheese for snacks and organic meats, chicken, fish, vegetables, lots of salads for meals. I’m happy to say I’m waking up tomorrow with not one single TV spot on my body, it’s truly a miracle, and it can be done!

      • Tony
      • December 1, 2015
      Reply

      Hi Greta. Happy birthday, and thank you so much for sharing your experience.

      I am sure your testimony will serve as a positive influence for many people.

      Most references to Tinea Versicolor only consider soaps and lotions for your skin. I like to take the multi-facet approach, and include diet and laundry as additional arsenal against the infection.

    • Marta
    • November 12, 2015
    Reply

    Hi Tony, last summer I noticed very tiny white dots on my arms and legs when my skin was more tanned. I had a quick google but soon forgot about it as it wasn’t bothersome. This month I had an outbreak of TV on my neck and chest, which is very noticeable with much larger white spots and blotches. It was quickly diagnosed as TV by a doctor a few days ago (I’m consulting another doctor in a couple of days just to make sure). I bought some anti fungal foam wash containing Econazole nitrate 1% and today will be my 3rd application. Today after some research I also started tea tree oil, coconut oil, pure aloe vera and my bed sheets are in the wash right now.

    I’m a big believer in an inside out approach so am very interested in your diet suggestions. I don’t eat a lot of fruit usually, I eat a fair amount of cheese but no other dairy products, I’m wheat intolerant and have avoided most wheat (and as a result yeast) products for the past 12 years and pretty much have eaten no wheat products at all in the last 2 years, I don’t have a sweet tooth so not much sweeteners (is honey ok?), and have not drunk much alcohol at all in the past year or so. However, I have increased my intake of fermented foods, including sauerkraut, fermented cucumbers in brine and home made kombucha since these foods supposedly balance your gut flora, help with digestive issues and boost the immune system.

    Could you please explain a little bit more about avoiding fermented foods?

      • Tony
      • November 14, 2015
      Reply

      Hi Marta. Thanks for contacting me.

      The quick answer to avoiding fermented foods is…fermenting foods is a process associated with yeast. And since yeast is a fungus, we try to avoid compounding the existing problem of our (over-active) body fungus, which is Tinea Versicolor.

      As for honey…it has similar characteristics to many other sweeteners. It is a concentration of glucose and fructose, which turns to carbohydrates in our bodies and feeds our fungus.

      I’ve included links below to some very interesting (and long) Wikipedia articles. I noted the relationship between yeast and kombucha…in just the first 2 paragraphs of each article.
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yeast
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kombucha

      A suggestion might be…try cutting out the fermented foods in your diet and observing the results. Take photos of your problem areas to document “before and after” comparisons.

    • Wickford
    • November 4, 2015
    Reply

    Thank you so much for putting together and maintaining this website. It is true that because of a lack of studying this condition there is a huge lack of consistent information about the causes and proper treatment of T.V. on the part of healthcare providers. So, a website like this one where so many folks suffering with T.V. have shared their experience helps to establish a collection of brief case studies that can be really helpful in seeing a clearer outline of cause and effect. I have a very particular medical history which helps to back up many of the connections that can be seen in people’s experience with T.V. and the relationship with the immune system as well as hormone levels. I have been HIV positive for 20 years this year and my first flare up of Tinea Versicolor was about 19 years ago. Unlike the common story many people hear about the progression of HIV rather than getting infected and, HIV slowly attacking my immune system while getting sicker and sicker I had a strange case where I got infected and immediately my immune system crashed so I went straight from healthy and negative to a month later having an AIDS diagnosis, no immune system and, nearly losing my life. I was very lucky in that the year I got sick in 1996 was also the year they came out on the market with the new medications that started saving everyone’s life. So, I got better but, only after spend almost a year with almost no immune system. Another thing that people often don’t think about in relation to the immune system is that one of the biggest parts of our immune system is our skin and, folks with HIV even if we are healthy we are more prone to skin issues. I had my first flare up of T.V. about a year after I started getting healthy again and the doctor I had at the time knew it was T.V. and treated it with about a month of diflucan and it went away for years except for a few spots that would come back on my back every so often and I would use Dr. Bronner’s Tea Tree soap as my daily shower soap and if it got bad I’d add some extra tea tree oil to the soap for a bit and that kept it controlled until about 8 years ago when I started hormones because I have joint issues and my doctor saw that my testosterone was low and wanted me to build muscle to protect my joints. At that time I had a new doctor and I had a TV flare up and my doctor decided to test some other things they had heard of and for the last 8 years they have tried a bunch of different things but, none have worked and it’s slowly gotten worse and worse. At this point my whole upper body is one huge outbreak and my skin is peeling and flaking and where I scratch in my sleep my skin just opens up and won’t heal right. My new dermatologist looked at it today and put me in a month of diflucan (fluconazole) because she says it is better teargeted to deal with yeast and fungus together and, in addition to make sure it really goes away for a good long time again I’m going to follow the advise on this website as well and get rid of yeast promoting foods and creating a regimen for cleaning laundry and me with anti-yeast and anti-fungal protocols. Thanks for everyone’s advice to each other and thanks again for this site!

      • Tony
      • November 6, 2015
      Reply

      Hi Wickford. Thanks for sharing with us.

      Your testimony speaks to the many facets of Tinea Versicolor. Including diet and laundry in your treatment, is a great approach to “setting the odds” in your favor.
      Good luck, and please keep us updated with your progress.

    • Ed
    • October 23, 2015
    Reply

    I was diagnosed with TV in 1988 while in the Marines. I’m now 48 and have been living with it ever since.

    Any idea how one contracts TV? My symptoms have never really been bad…just annoying and at times embarrassing.

    I am glad I found this website as it provides great info on the subject for folks like me, so thanks much!

    And just to confirm…TV is not contagious right?

      • Tony
      • October 26, 2015
      Reply

      Hi Ed. Thanks for contacting me, the kind comments, and thanks for serving.

      I sure feel you with the “annoying” and “embarrassing”…and I would add frustrating for the predictable recurrence with the seasons.

      Contracting Tinea Versicolor(TV) is reportedly due to “system imbalances within us”. Here’s an article I co-wrote about this What Causes Tinea Versicolor?

      And here is another short (but really informative) article, Is Tinea Versicolor Contagious?

    • Heidi
    • August 24, 2015
    Reply

    I caught this from a nursing home that I work out and have suffered with it for 3 years. I could not believe that a nursing facility actually let this lady with it use the public bathroom and infect other people with it. How negligent of them!

    It made me very angry when I discovered that I did catch it from there and had it at the same time the resident broke out with hers. I used the bathroom and around 5 days later I had the worse itch of my life right behind my right knee. I remember after using the restroom that I stood up and accidentally touched the bowl of the commode to my leg.

    I was also told by a nurse that she was being treated for it. When I confronted the job about it, they told me that I could not have caught it from there and that I must have got it from my dogs. I was devastated after being lied to and I knew that I was on my own!

    I did check my dogs at the time that I broke, out and none of them had it so I knew that it came from there. It really hurt my feelings that they were covering up this and could care less how much I was suffering with it.

    I have been through painful rashes and breakouts all over my body. The worse part was my neck and ears breaking out. How miserable that was! I was terrified that it would spread to my hair and to be honest I still don’t know that it hasn’t gone that far yet.

    I have spend a couple thousand dollars of my own money on fungal sprays which are not cheap and doctor visits. Sadly, I still have it and hope something will happen for me because I don’t want to go through 4 years with it. I have even thought of suicide before. I know that sounds crazy to some people but I have literally been through hell with it.

    You also are so afraid to touch anything in your house because you are scared of passing it on to others and leaving spores behind on furniture and other surfaces. I can see where some people may never get rid of it! I have read of people having it for 10 and even 20 years! I hope to God that does not happen to me!

      • Courtney
      • September 15, 2015
      Reply

      No offense but it’s not contagious. You can’t pass it to your dogs or anything in your house. I have it as well (obviously) and my boyfriend has to put the medication on my back because I can’t do it myself. If your doctor said it is, I think you need to get a second opinion. It’s 100% related to the amount of yeast on your skin.

      It sounds like you may have something else, honestly. Good luck to you. I would sincerely consider getting a second opinion.

      • Sylvia Plath
      • October 13, 2016
      Reply

      So much misinformation in your post.

    • SV
    • August 9, 2015
    Reply

    I seldom comment on anything but wanted to share this because I have been frustrated by this condition for 20 years. My condition is what I would classify as moderate, and have found some temporary relief with repeated Selson Blue shampoos. Everyone loves that smell! Symptoms returned in a matter of days. Then I read about Banana Boat Sunscreen For Kids SPF-50 sunscreen helping some cases. I thought why not give it a try.
    Almost overnight the symptoms were gone. I was holding my breath waiting for another outbreak – 3 weeks later and it’s still gone. I applied daily for the first week, and now as needed as spots appear in other previously untreated areas. Those spots are few and far between. Cheap, effective and no odor. Disclaimer: I am not a salesperson and do not endorse this product for financial gain. For me this worked and I hope it continues to do so.

      • Tony
      • August 12, 2015
      Reply

      Hi SV. Thanks for contacting me with your testimony.

      Frankly, this is new to me…but that’s not important. You have discovered what works for you…and that is great! I expect the high percentage (4%) zinc oxide is a factor.

      Has anybody else a similar testimony?

    • Jenna
    • July 12, 2015
    Reply

    Nice to know that I am not alone! I’ve been struggling with TV since I was approx 16, now 30, and its started spreading down my forearms with a vengeance. I try to follow paleo majority of the time and do CrossFit 2-4 times weekly (which I can see the sweat not helping). But seeing everything regarding diet and immune I didn’t see any responses/comments for a condition unique to myself.

    When I was 13, I had my appendix leak and removed. Then at the age of 20 there was a bowel obstruction and I had 8″ of both my small and large intestine removed. Ever since then, the flare ups have intensified. Just wondering if you may have heard of something (anything) like this that could trigger more intense flare ups within the last 7-8 years?

    Sorry so long. Thanks for any info! Also, I’ve tried lotions, selsun, anti-fungal, and tea tree oil that helped somewhat but need something else.
    Thanks!

      • Tony
      • July 13, 2015
      Reply

      Hi Jenna. Thanks for contacting me.

      The similarity to your case which I sometimes hear, is that after some kind of event such as surgery, a serious illness or severe allergic reaction…the person reports a more veracious bout of Tinea Versicolor. Not surprisingly, there isn’t any scientific explanation (or proof) of this. To be fair, we should consider that during these times, the body is sometimes subjected to drugs like antibiotics which have known fungus related side-effects. Also there are other external influences such as “sick-bed” environments which could play a part.

      I am of the opinion that if YOU feel there is a connection…then it is valid. I did note you mentioned “last 7-8 years”…so you should be well over any (external) influence from that time.

      Regardless of the cause, the treatment for Tinea Versicolor is the same. I’m seeing the best results from the Aidance Skincare range of products.

        • Teetee
        • September 4, 2015
        Reply

        Hello,
        Mine started while I was pregnant for my second kid about two and a half year ago, but grew very worse since I had my daughter through surgery. I suspected the surgery too. I have tried different stuff from selsun blue, zinc pyrithione shampoos, tea tree oil, sulpur soaps and creams but to no avail…

    • maddie
    • July 4, 2015
    Reply

    Hi. I have recently been diagnosed with TV from my skin doctor when I got a mole removed. I just got a skin test done and I’m waiting for the results. I will go to a dermatologist too, once I have the results (for a more in-depth diagnosis and discussion on eradicating it). I am 30 and since 14, I’ve always suffered a bit of itching around the ears and between the breasts, but not much, and an anti-fungal cream kept it at bay. Now I have a six month old baby and in the last three months, it suddenly spread like wildfire to the point where I’m desperate to get rid of it before it gets over my face. It’s on my arms, chest, back, thighs front and back, in my scalp, and around my ears which is crazy annoying…even in my ear canals. I have started the strict diet two days ago and I am taking multivitamins as well as a probiotic tablet daily. I use selsun shampoo, and dakta gold which doesn’t seem to do much. Recently I’ve bathed myself in diluted vinegar and tried bicarb of soda baths. That has helped sooth itching. I believe pregnancy hormones triggered TV for me. Also I think I did this to myself because I stopped taking elevit tablets whilst breastfeeding and I think I sapped myself dry of all my nutrients. I think my immune system is struggling now because of that, and hence why I broke out with TV. This is all hypothetical but it makes sense. I don’t want to stop breast feeding but if the TV doesn’t show signs of improvement soon, I may just have to…

      • Tony
      • July 6, 2015
      Reply

      Hi Maddie. Thanks for contacting me.

      I think you could use more effective products than the ones you mention…like some I list on the treatment page of the website. Routine is important when it comes to treatment…be faithful to your regimen daily. A very beneficial tool is to track the effectiveness of what you do by keeping a detailed journal of your skin.

      No doubt pregnancy plays havoc with the hormone and immune systems. But be assured, Tinea Versicolor can be controlled…not cured (none exist), but more by life-style.

    • Tina
    • June 9, 2015
    Reply

    Is just one glass of red wine ok? I am most saddened about wine being on the “BAD” list. How about beer? OK to drink or not? I know you said fruits, but how about organic fruits…OK to eat some?

      • Tony
      • June 15, 2015
      Reply

      Hi Tina.

      I know how difficult it can be to resist the foods on the list. I think moderation is key.

      Simply, be mindful that certain foods can promote the growth of fungus in our bodies and on our skin. Use this information to supplement your treatment against Tinea Versicolor.

        • Mel
        • June 25, 2015
        Reply

        Diet has nothing to do with tinea versicolor. Otherwise everyone would have it. That is almost as ridiculous as me saying that eating bread causes thrush…lol.

          • Tony
          • June 29, 2015
          Reply

          Hi Mel. Thanks for your comment.
          This article suggests contemplating our diet for foods that may promote the culprit body fungus of Tinea Versicolor(TV). It bears thinking, “what could UN-DO my efforts?”
          My approach to combating TV is “stacking the odds in my favor”.

            • Greg
            • July 3, 2015

            Tony – glad I found your website. I have had TV for almost 40 years, off and on since I was a teenager. I’ve treated it several times with Ketoconazole and Selsun Blue but it always comes back. I’m going to try changing my diet to see what impact that has. My wife of 25 years limits her dairy, beer (none), chocolate (none) and sugar and she’s never had any TV problems.
            Along with your diet and soap suggestions, I’m going to try adding more herbs to my diet – garlic, cloves and thyme for a start. I’ve got oily skin, and other things I’ve read suggest people with oily skin can be more susceptible to TV. Hopefully changing my diet and soap can make my skin a bad place for TV to hang out.
            Stacking the odds….

            • Tony
            • July 6, 2015

            Hi Greg. Thanks for contacting me.

            Stacking the odds…is a great strategy. At the least, it’s important to be aware of things we may be doing that is contrary to the good we do with soap etc.
            Please let us know how you make out.

    • Lola
    • April 9, 2015
    Reply

    I just recently was diagnosed with Tinea Versicolor. I’m 19. At first it wasn’t too bad, then it progressively got worse and started spreading on my back, neck and chest but not spots like the whole area is this brown dry rash. However, it went away surprisingly for like 3 weeks. Boy was I happy. Fast forward to about a week ago, it came back and this time it was HORRIBLE. It’s covered my chest in this horrendous dark brown wrinkly looking skin. It itches and when I shower it peels off and I think its getting better but as soon as it peels off it comes right back. Like I can literally just peel it off, however its still dark and red under my chest and upwards. I’ve started to get cuts of sorts from peeling the skin off and it doesn’t seem to be getting better. I’ve been using ketoconazole shampoo…not helping I don’t know what to do at this point it just seems like my chest will never look the same and its really saddening 🙁

      • Tony
      • April 11, 2015
      Reply

      Hi Lola. Thanks for contacting me.

      Have you seen a Dermatologist about your skin condition?
      Your symptoms appear to be beyond Tinea Versicolor. Please consult a professional.

    1. Reply

      Tinea Versicolor Saved The Day…kretchen.wordpress.com

    • Linda
    • February 22, 2015
    Reply

    Hi…I have been living with TV for 25 years. In the early days I would get really bad flareups and the itch was that severe I would wake up with deep scratches in my skin from scratching in my sleep.

    The first thing I was told to use was Perveryl foaming lotion and that was amazing. Cleared the itching instantly. I remember being so happy that I no longer had the intense itch, I felt relief for the first time in years. But the lotion didn’t stop it from coming back. When I had another flare up, I did my own research and found anti-dandruff shampoos did the same as Peveryl did. I’ve found that with the shampoos I don’t need to leave them on over night, but just wash with it a few times a week. At the moment I’m using Selsun yellow, but I’ve been told Selsun blue to be the better one. I’ve also used Nizorol too.

    About 5 years ago I figured out that when I eat bread, it’s like my body gives me these little clues that I shouldn’t be eating it. Nothing major like an allergy or anything. Just minor annoying things like bloating, pain and constipation. The idea to give up bread was for these issues and not so much for my skin. So anyway, I decided to only eat bread 3 times a week and stopped eating all breakfast cereals too. I found this easier than trying to give up all at once. After 3 months I felt so much better and looking back now the flare ups on my skin were minor in that time.

    So fast forward to now, and I’ve just had one of the biggest and worst flare ups ever.
    So it got me thinking what had changed recently that has caused this major flare up. Well 4 months ago I started a new job at a bread factory. I am able to take home all the bread I want. So not even thinking, I’ve been back to eating bread daily. It has to be a contributing factor for the flare up. So now I guess I’ll be back to eating bread occasionally or not at all. I’ve always thought it may have been possible the flare ups were caused from my diet.

      • Tony
      • February 24, 2015
      Reply

      Hi Linda. Thank you so much for sharing with us.

      What we ingest absolutely influences our physiology. And knowing this to utilize in our battle against Tinea Versicolor is like placing the odds in our favor for success.
      Make it more effective by sanitizing your laundry and using the best anti-fungal soaps.

      I remember too well…standing in the shower waiting for the foaming solution to dry on my skin, before getting into bed and feeling slimy and clammy all night long.
      And yes, it always came back…and I’d have to repeat the whole coarse of torture again.
      There are far more effective (and less agonizing ) methods with which to treat ourselves.

    • Alli
    • February 7, 2015
    Reply

    I have been dealing with TV since I was a teenager. I used creams and they worked ok, but it always came back. The past year I have been following The Paleo Diet which eliminates most of the foods you have listed as triggers. My flare ups have definitely been fewer, but I still get them, and I am now (finally) going to try giving up dairy. I never fully gave it up even though it is part of the Paleo guidelines. Recently I have been consuming much more of it and this morning noticed a flare up much worse than I’ve seen in a while. It must be the dairy. It will be hard, but I do not want to put chemicals on my body at all, so I will try and see if it works. When do you think I will see positive results? A month? I don’t want to get discouraged. Thanks, and I will update!

      • Tony
      • February 11, 2015
      Reply

      Hi Alli. Thanks for contacting me.

      Seasonality plays a big part with Tinea Versicolor. If you live in a part of the world that is presently in winter, you will see improvements to your skin condition quicker than during the warmer months of summer.
      The key in any case, is to be persistent in your method of eliminating dairy from your diet. And, I would suggest keeping a photo journal of your problem areas with regular updates.

      Please let us know of your progress.

    • ChiChi
    • October 28, 2014
    Reply

    I thought I was the only one struggling with TV.

    I had to cut out all the bad foods / drinks / sugars and hopefully I will see some change.

    I’m using natural remedies like Aloe Vera Plant/ Epsom Salts / Apple Cider Vinegar / Chewing a nasty Garlic clove / at the same time as Lamisil (though I miss drinking my wine) I hope everything works for the best!

    Thanks for sharing.

      • Tony
      • October 30, 2014
      Reply

      Hi ChiChi. Thanks for sharing with us.

      Millions of people around the world struggle with Tinea Versicolor. It’s unsightly, uncomfortable and embarrassing for the afflicted.

      The good news is that simple and effective methods are available to treat yourself and control the infection. Incorporating dietary considerations is a great life-style approach to treating yourself. Now, adding topical anti-fungals to your skin, as well as sanitizing your laundry creates a super-effective arsenal that really puts the odds in your favor.

        • ChiChi
        • November 25, 2014
        Reply

        The Good News!

        I have being using Castor Oil, mixed with Organic Tea Tree Oil and Lavender Oil. Dettol Soap for my everyday wash. I have continued taking my vitamins and soaking in Epsom salts at least twice a week – and the results have been great.

        I’m back to my regular life-style. But unfortunately I believe I’m allergic to dairy. I had brought back ice-cream / milk in my diet for a week and I had noticed an increase in the spread again. I also avoid baked goods for now.

        So far the results have been really great. Lamisil didn’t really do it for me. Hopefully this helps 🙂

          • Tony
          • November 26, 2014
          Reply

          Hi ChiChi. Thanks for the update.

          I am glad you’ve found something that works for you.
          I commend you for taking a “whole picture” approach and addressing not only what you apply on your body, but also what you ingest.

          Keep up the good work.

    • Priscilla
    • October 21, 2014
    Reply

    I have suffered from TV for about 14 years. It was at its worst when I got pregnant. It spread like wild fire and covered my entire torso, back, under arms, chest and groin. It was painful, itchy, red and raw, and unfortunately when you are pregnant/breastfeeding, there is only so much that you can do. I got by with covering myself with coconut oil daily. I was greasy, but at least the itching was somewhat relieved. I have been doing my research, and have come across wheat or gluten allergies as being a culprit, and I do not see it on your list. I am going to try giving up anything with gluten for a month or so and see if my current flare-up subsides. While pregnant, I had cravings for peanut butter and jelly sandwiches which I ate on wheat bread every single day! I wonder if thats why my TV was at its worst! Another thing I have read is oregano oil as a supplement. I just ordered that as well, and will be taking two drops daily in addition to elimanating all wheat and extra sugars. Thank you for your very informative and helpful site. I hope that one day there can be a cure for TV. It seems to be a very common issue!

      • Tony
      • October 21, 2014
      Reply

      Hi Priscilla. Thanks for contacting me.

      I have heard from many women about their worsening skin condition during pregnancy. It is easy to understand that during such a time of flux within the body, Tinea Versicolor could be exaggerated since its cause is rooted in the immune or hormonal systems.

      Have you been tested for wheat/gluten intolerance? I would be very interested to know if eliminating gluten from your diet helps clear your skin.

      And thank you for the kind comments.

        • Priscilla
        • October 23, 2014
        Reply

        Thanks for your reply Tony. Hormones must definitely play a part because I do have some hormone issues. I have never been tested for gluten allergies. My plan is to eliminate wheat from my diet for a month or so, and then slowly reintroduce and see how my body reacts. I will be sure to follow up with my findings! The oil of oregano has amazing anti-fungal and antibiotic properties so I am really looking forward to using it to cleanse my body internally and clear up my current TV flare up. Thanks again for your dedication to helping others with this awful disease!

          • jeanybilos
          • January 3, 2015
          Reply

          Priscilla, I would like to know any updates of your TV situation? I have been suffering on and off with TV since I was 14 y.o. I noticed it shows up during my period weeks. It’s pretty depressing, almost every day I would almost cry seeing it get worse. I’ve lost confidence , I don’t know what I’m going to do. I tried Nizoral Creams, Selsun Blue and Lotrimin. It seems it’s not getting better at all…I just got pregnant and I am just hoping it will lessen during the 3rd trimester…

            • Priscilla
            • September 1, 2015

            Hello Jeany. I am just seeing your question now. I’m am proud to say that after about 15 years of battling Tinea, I have finally been able to calm my breakouts. I believe that wheat/gluten is the culprit. I have cut out bread/pasta/baked goods to the best of my ability and I take oregano oil drops daily (I believe this is what REALLY cleared me up). However, you should NOT take oregano oil when pregnant or breastfeeding. When I do have weak moments and indulge in bread or pizza, my skin reacts immediately, so again I stay away from those types of foods, and try to remember my oregano oil every day. With that, the spots go away. I hope this helps!

    • Luke
    • September 16, 2014
    Reply

    Try Pevaryl Foaming Solution. You can have it delivered and it will remove your TV in three days. It will come back if you eat the wrong things. Cut out the booze, carbs and refined sugars. Add a quality probiotic and you should see results. Or just use the foaming solution as required.

      • Tony
      • September 18, 2014
      Reply

      Hi Luke. Thanks for your comment.

      Pevaryl Foaming Solution was the very first thing that was prescribed to me by a dermatologist, many years ago.

      I remember too clearly the horrible experience of covering my entire body with the foam and standing in the shower until the solution dried on my skin before going to bed with an uncomfortable all-over sticky feeling. I had varying degrees of success with this…and like you mentioned…it always came back, sometimes worse!

      If this works for you…great!
      I found (for me personally) there are more convenient techniques with far more effective results.

    • Neon
    • September 5, 2014
    Reply

    Hi everyone,

    You can try Neem oil. I hope it is easily available in the U.S. or any other county. Shouldn’t be expensive I guess.

    Before going to bed at night you can use Neem oil to rub on your body but if you are applying on face then you need to mix four or five drops Neem oil with Coconut oil or Castor oil and wash it in the morning with hot water.

    Just sharing some things I have tried. Hope it helps others also. Keep fighting and trust in your body.

      • Tony
      • September 6, 2014
      Reply

      Hi Neon. Thanks for sharing with us.

      All products you mentioned are known for their anti-fungal and anti-bacterial qualities. It sounds like you are winning your “fight”.

    • George
    • August 19, 2014
    Reply

    I have been living with TV since teenagehood. I do understand the stress that this condition exerts on its carriers. Please note for your convenience –

    Avoid Ketoconazole (banned already in EUROPE) and replace with Fluconazole OR Itraconazole as per your doctor’s prescription.

    AVOID exposure to direct sunlight DURING therapy. Usually lasts for 8 days when taking Itraconazole 100mg. Once spots have turned white then go for a nice suntan.

    I agree with the diet guidelines. Nevertheless a cup of coffee and two fruits a day do more good than harm. Dont forget that antioxidants and vitamins are far more important than TV.

    Use an Aloe Vera cream for your skin on a daily basis mixed with some drops of tea tree oil. This subdues the fungus causing TV and leaves your skin healthy.

    If you are a hairy guy…then…tough…get that automatic trimmer and trim your hair slightly…(unless you plan to be a bodybuilder). This allows your skin to breathe and reduce condensation.

      • Tony
      • August 21, 2014
      Reply

      Hi George…some good advice. Thanks for sharing with us.

      I would point out that the drugs you mentioned all belong to the “azole” group of anti-fungals. They work in similar ways to inhibit fungal growth, and all have damaging side-effects to your organs. More importantly to understand is the fact that these drugs DO NOT CURE Tinea Versicolor…and that repeat outbreaks are very likely.

      I personally prefer a topical solution with no side-effects that can be used effectively over time.

    • Kyle
    • August 7, 2014
    Reply

    Planning to follow everything on the site. I have questions… Do I eliminate ALL sugars, completely? So like no fructose in a shake, etc.? Or do I cut down? And, can I use whole wheat flour products? As long as it has no yeast? And can I use products with oats? Also, after the initial two weeks of using the routine; body wash etc? Can I continue to use the soap after then – as a regular soap?

      • Tony
      • August 20, 2014
      Reply

      Hi Kyle. Thanks for contacting me.

      Eliminating sugar and yeast from your diet is a strategy designed to stack the odds in your favor…so the more you can oblige, the better chances you have of fighting the infection. That can also be said about sanitizing your laundry.

      As part of a maintenance regimen, I suggest you continue to use an anti-fungal soap regularly.

    • Andy
    • July 20, 2014
    Reply

    What is it about caffeine that makes it unacceptable for TV. Is it the caffeine itself or additives that we generally put in our caffeinated beverages. Would black coffee be acceptable?

      • Tony
      • July 30, 2014
      Reply

      Hi Andy. Thanks for contacting me.

      Know what…I couldn’t find sufficient evidence to indicate caffeine is detrimental to Tinea Versicolor symptoms…I have struck it from the list.
      Thanks.

    • Linda
    • May 31, 2014
    Reply

    I was diagnosed with TV 3 years ago…I was only ever told to use anti fungal shampoos and soaps. I don’t really see any big changes with that. The diet is tough… I literally eat and drink everything on the bad list…more so in the past 2 years because I quit smoking. Despite the fact I live off the bad food choices…I could kiss them all good bye if I knew it would cease the progression of this. I’m willing to try. I’m also going to get into a grooming routine of apple cedar and hydrogen peroxide…the anti fungal shampoos and the vitamins. I’m fairly good with the laundry…but are there recommendations on that too? Just FYI…I am 42 and female. It affects me mostly on my back and neck…but sometimes on my chest… It’s particularly inflamed at the moment…I’m ready to peel my skin off.

      • Tony
      • June 1, 2014
      Reply

      Hi Linda. Thanks for contacting me.

      I feel your frustration. Anyone visiting this site would sympathize. But the good news is that Tinea Versicolor, while not curable is controllable.

      My personal approach (and that which gets best results,) is multi-faceted. I applaud you for using soaps and shampoos. But its only a start. Consider limiting certain foods in your diet as a weapon to aid you in your fight. By disregarding this, you could be undoing all the benefits of the anti-fungals.

      Laundry habits is another weapon to add to your arsenal. Read my article on sanitizing your laundry for some powerful tips.

      One more tip for you…keep a detailed log-book on everything you try (with time and date, amounts, etc,) with regular photos of the problem areas.

      Please let us know how you make out with the apple cider and hydrogen peroxide.

      • Shannon
      • August 13, 2014
      Reply

      This condition has worsened for me since, no surprise here, moving to FLorida last summer. I had it somewhat under control and then I went to the beach today. Good grief. I look like a damn freak. I don’t eat processed junk, bread, sugar, I do eat some cheese and every so often yogurt. Coffee and wine must be my main culprits because my diet is pretty much clean except for an occasional treat.
      Well, I am not giving up wine or coffee.
      There must be ways to keep it under control. Not sweating is not an option either. lol! OH, and I work out outside where I have my gym set up so I sweat A LOT! I am so frustrated today. Off to buy more dandruff shampoo and anti fungal cream.

        • Tony
        • August 21, 2014
        Reply

        Hi Shannon. Thanks for sharing.

        I have to admit, I don’t have the resolve to give up everything totally. That’s too much. But I do find that during times of a heavy outbreak, limiting these foods increases my success rate.

    • Jay
    • February 26, 2014
    Reply

    I have had this relentless TV for over 20 years now. I live in humid Florida and have a bad “Mountain Dew” addiction. So that doesn’t help my cause much. The shampoo topically will help, but it takes longer to make the redness go away. The anti fungal creams seem to work quicker, but I took ketoconazole in a tablet once, and the entire TV rash cleared in like 2 days. I tried to get this medication another time, and the MD at the walk in clinic wouldn’t give me a Rx. She said you can just apply some lotion. I went into full Raging Bull mode, and I think DeNiro would of been proud. I gave a passionate speech about how I am a prisoner of this condition, and never go to the beach, because of embarrassment. She finally gave me a script, but for Diflucan which didn’t work as good as the ketoconazole tablets. My recommendation is take the ketoconazole tablet x 2, get rid of this damn TV, then daily apply the shampoo before you shower. Best of luck to you all. I feel your pain!

      • Tony
      • February 28, 2014
      Reply

      Hi Jay. Thanks for your comment. I’m glad you found something that works best for you.

      The unpredictable nature of Tinea Versicolor (TV,) makes it frustrating in a way that not all treatments work the same for different people. While oral treatments obtained by prescription can be quite effective for some people, they also have commonly documented side-effects such as damaging internal organs.

      Additionally frustrating is the fact that there is no “magic pill” for TV that treats the actual underlying cause of the infection. And ultimately it will always return.
      For this reason, I personally prefer a treatment strategy that is more synergistic.

      • Chris
      • June 23, 2014
      Reply

      Hi Jay,

      Just be cautious about any prolonged use of it, though it sounds like your approach is quite short term.
      Quoted from Wikipedia; The European Medicines Agency’s Committee on Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) has recommended that a ban be imposed on the use of ketoconazole for systemic use in humans throughout the European Union, after concluding that the risk of serious liver injury from systemic ketoconazole outweighs its benefits.[2] In Australia, the oral formulation of ketoconazole has already been discontinued

    • LaShonda
    • October 16, 2013
    Reply

    My doctor first discovered the the flaky spots on my skin at age 12, she gave me a medicated soap and after using it once, the dry/flaky spots ceased, however she never gave me a name for the skin condition. I haven’t seen that doctor since I was 14 yrs old. I first noticed the return at age 21 maybe…I am now 24 years old and the spots are in back FULL FORCE attack mode! Every month I notice a new place that it has spread.

    Spread to the point that people are starting to notice this flaky skin.

    I literally just researched this today and realized that there is actually a name for this skin condition. I’ve notice that my TV is not mild at all…I experience all syptoms…patches of noticeably dry, flaky, discolored, super itchy skin on my neck, chest, back. I’m extremely happy to have read the comments in this post that there are many others with a common issue.

    I’ve tried multiple lotions and recently began using tea tree cream but I’m getting frustrated…should I see a dermotologist or is there a simple remedy?

    Help please!!!

      • LaShonda
      • October 16, 2013
      Reply

      Something is seriously triggering the outbreak…maybe too much sugar!

        • Tony
        • October 17, 2013
        Reply

        Hi LaShonda. Thanks for contacting me.

        I always suggest seeing a Dermatologist. Only they can positively identify the cause of your rash, and the severity of the extent over your body. Just be sure to ask for an analysis of a scraping of your skin and a Wood’s Lamp test.

        There is a lot more you can do for your skin other than tea tree cream. Please read my post Treatment of Tinea Versicolor.

        Be mindful that this condition is very persistent. I find it best to start treating yourself at home with “all guns blazing” and every weapon you have. And once it appears to be subsiding…don’t stop your routine, but start modifying to a more maintenance-style habit.

        Sugar certainly can aggravate your symptoms.

    • Michael
    • October 13, 2013
    Reply

    I have had tinea versicolor for 6 years, and its spreading rather than reducing, even though I tried all shampoos, soaps, creams, etc. I didnt try taking anti-fungal pills yet though, so maybe that will do the trick. There was a time during my first year or so when I thought it went away, but it came back worse than before and it never went away since.

    I wanted to say that I heard that yogurt was good to eat because of the probiotics. I heard that people with TV may have reduced healthy bacteria, and it can be helpful to replace them. I also heard that Apple Cider Vinegar was good too.

      • Tony
      • October 14, 2013
      Reply

      Hi Michael. Thanks for your comment.

      If you’ve suffered with Tinea Versicolor(TV) for any amount of time you’ve bound to have heard many things, most of which are unsupported by fact specifically for TV. This is largely due to the lack of scientific study of this infamous infection.

      Now don’t get me wrong. I am not saying you shouldn’t try some of these “home-remedies” for yourself. (God knows I’ve had my fair share of frustration-induced experiments.) What I would like to express clearly is my belief that this tenacious skin condition should be dealt with a multi-faceted approach.

      I believe the best strategy is to incorporate proven-performance anti-fungal soaps and creams with dietary considerations and bathing/laundry habits. This is what works best for me.
      There is nothing singular that you can take or do to cure Tinea Versicolor. Unfortunately, this is fact.

      Something I find extremely beneficial is a detailed (and honest,) log-book with periodic photos of my skin whenever I’m trying something different or new. It eliminates the guess work.

    • Joe
    • September 29, 2013
    Reply

    I was wondering if I should stay away from chips like Doritos and Cheetos because I’ve been eating them mostly everyday since I was a teen. My doctor told me being outside in the sun and sweating can cause TV. I would sweat a lot and sometimes I would take a shower later on that day (I know I know…disgusting.) She said that this can make it worse. My diet was basically not good either. I wouldn’t eat fruits or veggies, eating sweets, drinking alcohol on weekends. I know our immune system plays a part of TV and I heard fruits will boost it. I’ve seen other websites suggesting to eat fruits daily to help TV but you said to avoid it , so I don’t know what to do on that regard. I’m going to start on that diet, just want to know if chips are bad and if I can eat any fruits? Thanks for the info.

      • Tony
      • October 1, 2013
      Reply

      Hi Joe. Thanks for contacting me.

      Snacking chips like Doritos and Cheetos are full of fatty oils that go to promote ideal conditions on your skin for Tinea Versicolor(TV) to thrive. Fruits contain high amounts of sugars, also known to promote conditions for your body fungus.

      I know its extremely difficult to cut-out everything at once…but here’s what I do.
      I simply limit my intake of these known culprits…as much as my tolerance will let me. Any reduction is considered a positive step in my arsenal against TV, and mostly I am disciplined about it.

      I used to eat a lot of dried fruits in my morning cereal, and as a quick-n-easy healthy snack…until I learned that dried fruit has significantly more sugar than the fresh fruit!

      I have cut out dried fruits from my diet completely without too much trouble…but I still do enjoy limited amounts of fresh fruits. And to help my immune system, I take vitamin supplements. Have you seen my post, “Vitamins that treat Tinea Versicolor”?

        • Joe
        • October 5, 2013
        Reply

        Yea I might limit fresh fruits and eat the ones with less sugar. It’s a good thing I’m not a coffee lover, I actually don’t drink none at all. I’ve cut out sugary drinks and sweets about 5 months ago and beer awhile back. Only thing I was still eating was chips and breads. Also my doctor told me to eat yogurt, do you think 2-3 a week is good? Another thing does lack of exercise play a role in TV? Thanks again.

          • Tony
          • October 7, 2013
          Reply

          Joe,

          So little scientific research has been conducted on Tinea Versicolor that we’re obliged to find what works for ourselves. (That’s why this website was started.)

          Yogurt, as it pertains to Tinea Versicolor, is a very controversial subject. Many references can be found online that suggest yogurt is beneficial for it’s probiotic or lactic acid properties, but let me point out that not one of these sources is scientific in origin.
          Yogurt and dairy products contain carbohydrates and fats which are known to promote fungus. Most commercially produced yogurts have flavoring and sweeteners added, further compounding the tally.
          I consider the jury is still “out” as to whether yogurt is truly beneficial for Tinea Versicolor. I would suggest you look for natural yogurt containing active cultures.

          Interestingly, I regularly receive feedback from visitors to the website from regions of the Mediterranean and India that suggests they actually smear yogurt directly onto the effected areas of their skin. I personally tried this myself for a period many years ago and had no noticeable success.

          And since your immune system is connected to TV, a lack of exercise that boosts a healthy system could be detrimental to your skin condition. Remember to sanitize your laundry, bathe and increase your anti-fungal regimen accordingly to offset the increased perspiration.

    • Nicole
    • September 3, 2013
    Reply

    Hello!

    I’ve been battling TV for almost 10 years now. Just wanted to share my pregnancy and TV experience. During my first pregnancy, my TV was very mild and didn’t bother me at all. It came and went as it has normally done for the past ten years. After being diagnosed with thyroid cancer and having my thyroid partially removed, my TV came back full force and was absolutely a nightmare to get rid of. I got pregnant again and the second time around TV has been absolutely dreadful. The worst I’ve ever had in my life — and of course the medications are not safe to take during pregnancy. So I looked into changing my diet! And I’m going to go full force once I have baby #2. I’ll let you know how it goes!

      • Tony
      • September 4, 2013
      Reply

      Hi Nicole. Thanks for contacting me.

      The body in flux during pregnancy is a mystery as far as Tinea Versicolor is concerned. Many women claim their skin actually clears during this time. Not much research has been conducted in this area…unfortunately. Please do report back with an update.

      I hope you have the thyroid cancer resolved.

    • Brandy
    • August 9, 2013
    Reply

    I have had TV for 20 years off and on. I have tried everything…I mean EVERYTHING! This last year has been my worse…and I am 38. I am a happy Mom of two beautiful kiddos and a fun loving husband. The last thing I have time to deal with is itchy, scaley, flaky skin when we go to the pool, lake, or boating. This year it crawled up my neck into my scalp and brushed my high cheek bone. Almost made me scrub my skin off in the shower. I have it across my back and spots on my arm as well. I cannot believe that this is such a difficult disorder to diagnose and treat…You would think that at this day and age modern medicine could figure out an actual cure. But they haven’t…so every year…I scramble to squash the “Derma Beast” (love that term that your first reviewer named it). I totally sympathize with each and every one of you. OHHHhh… and to add insult to injury… I work part time at a winery. So needless to say the yeast in wine is also my passion and hobby. Yayyyy me!

      • Tony
      • August 13, 2013
      Reply

      Hi Brandy. Thanks for your comment.

      I can only imagine that the big pharmaceutical companies simply do not see enough revenue in curing Tinea Versicolor to justify the expense of research. But on a positive note…through disciplined routine this “derma-beast” can be tamed.

    • David
    • July 30, 2013
    Reply

    I am 54 years old and have been dealing with the “Derma-beast” since I was 17. I have been through all the dermatologists’ standard treatments. I have lived in New England for 25 years but have traveled extensively in the military to all sorts of climates. My TV has ranged from severe thickening of skin to mild. Of course it mostly reappears during the summer months due to hot work and humidity. I have always believed that taking wheat products and alcohol out of my diet would greatly reduce the outbreaks. Hard to do this in the summer months..one has to live a little. The coffee was a shocker since I am a heavy partaker in that beverage. The only treatment I use right now is the 1% selenium sulfide shampoos, this does slightly reduce the outbreak if done regularly. I truly want to try this diet and I hope it can release some of the bonds the TV has had on me for the last 37 years. Thanks for the site and I will let you know how it works for me.
    Thanks

      • Tony
      • August 1, 2013
      Reply

      Hi David. Thanks for contacting me.

      I love that phrase, “Derma-Beast”! Unfortunately I am too familiar with it as I also experience unwelcome re-visits in summer.
      I definitely receive more positive feedback from people who use Pyrithione-Zinc to any other substance for treating their Tinea Versicolor. Have you tried Noble Formula Soap or shampoo?

    • Jay
    • July 21, 2013
    Reply

    Hi Tony,

    I’ve had TV for a couple years and its seems to reoccur whenever my diet is bad over a sustained period and the weather is hot. However when my diet is clean it’s seems to decrease in its appearance but never go away. Is there a routine of anti fungal soaps and tablets I should take to get rid of it alongside taking care of my diet? I’m very confused about the fruit situation though… I generally eat five fruit and veg each day as part of a balanced diet but you’ve suggested cutting them out all together. I understand they have a lot of sugar but is it sensible to cut out fruit from your diet completely? What’s should I do regarding anti fungal soaps and tablets as well as my diet?

    Thanks!

      • Tony
      • July 23, 2013
      Reply

      Hi Jay. Thanks for contacting me.

      The list of foods to avoid in your diet is very difficult to eliminate completely…I absolutely agree. My aim was to provide people with another facet to battling their Tinea Versicolor. In many cases, people are unaware that their diet plays a part of this skin condition.

      Here’s what I do. I simply taper down on the foods I can’t live without, and try to be selective on foods with less natural sugars and yeasts.
      Remember, there is more to it than just soaps and creams…and everything helps to stack the odds in your favor.

      As for a routine of anti-fungal soaps and tablets…

      Follow this link for my 4 step strategy on Tinea Versicolor treatment.

      Follow this link for vitamins that treat Tinea Versicolor.

    • Sidra
    • June 7, 2013
    Reply

    Hi..
    I’m going through TV now a days, and I’m going insane because of these spots on my neck and arms..and my doctor said don’t eat eggs…you said this is good for TV…I’m confused…please help me.

      • Tony
      • June 8, 2013
      Reply

      Hi Sidra. Thanks for contacting me.

      I have never heard this before nor can I find this in any online source. Perhaps you can ask your doctor to elaborate and let us know his reasons.

    • Vanessa
    • June 2, 2013
    Reply

    Just to add to the pregnancy affect on TV…the first time I was pregnant..it mostly went away during pregnancy and returned aggressively a year after baby was born. My second pregnancy it went away completely…baby is now 8 months and TV has not returned yet.

      • Tony
      • June 3, 2013
      Reply

      Thanks for that Vanessa.

    • Summer
    • May 7, 2013
    Reply

    I noticed the comment about TV and it going away during pregnancy.

    I had it pre-pregnancy, took oral medication from dermo and it went away no problem. BUT- it came back. I didn’t have the chance to take anything as I became pregnant in that time. The spots did go away during pregnancy and didn’t show back up until a full year after baby. Spread rapidly this time and it’s been very challenging to get rid of this round!

    So, I think hormones could play a part – during preg and year after I also did not drink any alcohol which could have contributed to the fact that it didn’t show up and spread as well. Food for thought.

      • Tony
      • May 7, 2013
      Reply

      Hi Summer…and thanks for your comment.

      I’d say pregnancy is a miracle in more ways than what we imagine.

      Can any more moms comment on Tinea Versicolor during and post pregnancy?

    • Tori
    • April 14, 2013
    Reply

    Hi.

    I was wondering if natural yoghurt would be ok?

    Thanks

      • Tony
      • April 16, 2013
      Reply

      Hi Tori.

      Natural yogurt is good to eat…and although I cannot confirm this…some people have commented on the benefits to their Tinea Versicolor condition when they actually rub it onto their skin!

      Please let us know what works for you.

    • Emily
    • April 3, 2013
    Reply

    Hi,
    I just wanted to say im a teen and have had tv for a while now. It’s come and gone first on my stomach and now its gone onto my lower back and back of my neck. After reading the foods to stay away from I’m going to have to stay away from chocolate and coffee. Do you think that it’ll go away using ketoconazale 2% in shampoo and in tablet form can help? Also increasing in veggies?

      • Tony
      • April 4, 2013
      Reply

      Hi Emily. Thanks for contacting me.

      I know it’s a bummer about chocolate and coffee…but it does help. I personally limit the intake of fungus producing foods, rather than try to eliminate them totally.

      Ketoconazale is an anti-fungal and will help with your fight in controlling Tinea Versicolor…I have used it in shampoos as a body wash but found pyrithione zinc more effective (and gentle,) on my skin.

      And veges are always good for you.

    • Charlie
    • March 19, 2013
    Reply

    Just wanted to say, I have between living between Bali (tropics) and Australia for the last 2 years off and on and have started getting TV in cycles. It comes and goes. It really didn’t seem like anything worked. I was told it lasts at least 8 weeks so there really isn’t a whole lot you can do. I found out about this Yeast Free Diet 4 months ago – I am a bit of a coffee addict so it was really hard, but I have got to say after 1 week of doing the diet quite strictly, my TV completeley cleared!!! Its really worth a go!! You can apply all the creams you like but I feel it’s more an internal infection, and doing the diet really worked for me so I just wanted to share 🙂

      • Tony
      • March 20, 2013
      Reply

      Hi Charlie…thanks for your comment…and feedback.

    • Danelle
    • February 8, 2013
    Reply

    This is right on. Makes sense. 4yrs ago I broke out in hives, head to toe. After months of tests no one could figure it out. Until a friend in my step aerobics class notice me breaking out when I heated up. She told me to google yeast over growth syndrome. I did a yeast free/sugar free diet for 7 of the 9 days and they got MUCH better. I still get hives everyday but much less and smaller ones. The foods I CRAVE are all on the list. They are the foods I truly love. Probably because my body wants them to feed the yeast. That makes this diet incredible hard. I, in the past year, have weird white spots on my back….so here I am Tinea Versicolor. Yup yet another yeast related skin issue. I’ve also had trouble with recurring yeast infections. Wish the doctors I’d seen 4 yrs ago knew this. Thanks for the info. And the terrible diet plan. Acidophilus has helped with it too. I take it in the pill form.

      • Tony
      • February 9, 2013
      Reply

      Hi Danelle…thanks for your comment and advice.

    • lori
    • January 31, 2013
    Reply

    I was diagnosed with TV and given a prescription that did not work along with selsun blue. I was told to wash it off after putting it on the shower (dah….. I was never told to sleep with it on all night). Sooooo it spread and now i have it on my thighs, the back of my knees, the inside of my elbows and outside arm area, help! I went to another doctor who did a biopsy (after going to another doctor who treated me the same way as the first) who said it was negative for TV (okay good, it was gone,) but then said but may be very early signs of vitaligo!! I think they are guessing at this point, saying that it is usually on the back and I have it it odd places. I am desperate to find a solution an I must thank you immensely for the valuable information on your site. I am going to try it all immediatley. Washing my sheets as I type!! Any suggestions? Sort of freaked out about the vitaligo thing but also think they are just fishing. God I hate doctors……

      • Tony
      • February 1, 2013
      Reply

      Hi Lori…and thanks for your comment.

      I certainly feel your frustration with the medical world…but I would strongly suggest getting an accurate diagnosis.

      Since both Tinea Versicolor and Vitaligo concern skin tone, you could look to vitamins A, C, and E to help promote your body’s production of Melanin to restore your natural color.

    • KimH
    • November 27, 2012
    Reply

    I have had a nail infection in one of my toenails for years. I injured my toe when I was a child and have been fighting this nail infection and athletes foot since then. I only get athletes foot around the infected nail on one foot. I am in my mid twenties and just had a baby last year. I contracted Tv pretty bad while pregnant. It is under my arms and started spreading down my back and my front. I was wondering if I took lamisil pills for my nail infection would this clear up my tv? Are they related? Because I am prone to both there must be something internally wrong? I am breastfeeding my baby now so the doctor said I have to wait to take any medication.

      • admin
      • November 28, 2012
      Reply

      Hi Kimberlee…thanks for contacting me.

      Breaking out in Tinea Versicolor (TV,) during pregnancy is not uncommon since the immune and hormone systems undergo so much flux. (Remember, TV appears on your body surface as symptomatic patches, but the source is actually within.)

      TV is related to any other body fungus (for example your athletes foot,) in a way that it WILL react to an anti-fungal agent such as Lamisil. I would suggest consulting your Doctor on using a topical anti-fungal agent (cream or spray,) that would relieve both.

      You may be interested to know that people who use pyrithione zinc soap for their TV have also reported benefits for fungus in other areas of their body such as athletes foot, jock itch, etc.

    • Heisenberg
    • November 12, 2012
    Reply

    So technically this is a permenant disease….

    • Marcus
    • November 1, 2012
    Reply

    Ah crap. Coffee is in the no-can list. I OWN a coffee roastery/cafe!! I do avoid dairy, I try to cut down on cheese (previously due to health reasons)… Fruits are gonna be hard to cut. Bread’s not too much of a problem. But under anything fermented, you’re basically saying no alcohol… D:
    This is just a shock to the system because I just found out that I had TV today after a few months of wondering what this patch on my back was.
    Thanks for this list and I guess I have to adopt it and limit/cut out whatever is on the no-can list.

      • Tony
      • November 2, 2012
      Reply

      It’s not easy when you discover many of your favorite foods may be promoting Tinea Versicolor.

      Here’s what I do…reduce my intake gradually over time, and never get upset with myself when I “break the rules” every now and then.

        • Heisneberg
        • November 6, 2012
        Reply

        Is it possible that this condition can be completely eliminated and not come back again if I commit to this diet?

          • admin
          • November 7, 2012
          Reply

          Hi Heisneberg.

          A true, all encompassing Tinea Versicolor strategy should incorporate medications and lotions for your skin, as well as sanitation considerations for your personal laundry combined with a better understanding of your diet which may include yeast promoting foods.

          A strategy that works for me (and many other people whom have adopted it,) is detailed on the Treatment Of Tinea Versicolor page.

          Please let us know what works for you.

            • Heisenberg
            • November 9, 2012

            Fine, but what I’m generally asking Is, can this thing be 100 percent eliminated through proper treatment. can I complelety cure this plauge.

            • admin
            • November 11, 2012

            It amazes me that to this day there is no medical cure for Tinea Versicolor. (My favorite name for it which was coined by one of our writers is “derma-beast”.) But you can manage the symptoms very easily and effectively by following a strategy such as which I described. Let me add, that you must be disciplined in your routine.

            By managing the symptoms, your skin WILL soon return to a healthy (normal,) appearance, and any associated discomfort (itching, soreness, etc.) abate.

    • cinch diet kit
    • September 18, 2012
    Reply

    Solid. Thanks.

    • Autum
    • August 5, 2012
    Reply

    You know there could be a lot of truth to the diet. I have been in Denmark for a month now and they are a bread heavy country. It’s a staple– I have noticed since I have been here my TineaV has gotten a LOT worse. It actually showed up on my face. It has never done that. I have been keeping it at bay with Lamisil cream, but I after reading this I think I should cut back on the bread too. Great info!

      • Tony
      • August 6, 2012
      Reply

      Thanks for your comment Autum.
      Please check-in again soon.

    • Kim
    • August 3, 2012
    Reply

    Ugh…I was just diagnosed with TV yesterday after itching for 3 months. I was led to believe after 3 weeks of the shampoo and cream, It’d be gone. It sounds like you all “live” with it. And that list of foods-I’m a clean eater and eat fruit and greek yogurt all the time along with the many items on the “can have” list.

      • Tony
      • August 5, 2012
      Reply

      Hi Kim.
      Tinea Versicolor is relentless.
      You need to understand the reason why you have TV is because of a hormone or immune system imbalance. So even when you think you’ve defeated it based on what you see or feel on your skin (the symptoms,)…the underlying source is still present.
      A long term routine is the only way to manage TV.

    • Nicolina
    • August 3, 2012
    Reply

    Hi Tony, Firstly I would like to say thank you for this site. I hated the diet plan when I read it, but you made me laugh out loud alot whilst reading what i should avoid. haha. Ok, I have had Tv for just a month now, since returning from a weeks holiday in Kefalonia. Im have naturally olive skin being greek, so these white patches that are ONLY on my Face look like I am a lepoard. Im 40 years of age, so im in the rare catagory of TV apparently. I think I could deal with this condition better if it was not on my face but im now freaking out. Working within the beauty Industry as a wedding makeup artist does not help either.
    When I first realised i had this condition from the internet, I purchased a soap and an oil from http://www.naturasil.co.uk which is a homeopathic treatment After using it for a month I have seen nothing ut it has spread on my face. So during this time I went to the doctor who told me its not TV its sun damage!! I asked to be reffered to a dermatologist but they said there was no need!!
    I have since been back to another doctor who said yes it is TV and it should go away by using canasten crem 1%. Suprise suprise, its not working either.
    I then came home knowing my doctor is rubbish and I contiued to use the naturasil products, still not working. I have now come across your site and I am going to do all i can to implement the diet. What im concerned about is what can I use that REALLY DOES WORK to bring back the pigment in my skin. Im really desperate now. Also if i continue this diet as a life long plan and if I take these vitamins called ACIDOPHILIUS PLUS which is a non dairyblend of capsules which apparently women use alot in the UK for keeping thrush at bay. ( so Im taking these capsules as thrush is also a yeast condition which we all know, So Im hoping that if its good for Candida/thrush it should be ok as a supplement for TV. So im trying as much as possible) Can anyone tell me what i can do to bring back the pigment in my skin and how long does it take on average for the colour to come back. Thanks again for this site, I feel alot more positive after reading it. I feel like im not so alone. haha. Although I have not come across anyone who has had it on their face, so I would love to hear from anyone who has. Thanks for taking the time for reading this. xx

      • Tony
      • August 4, 2012
      Reply

      I sent you an email Nicolina…please check back with us soon to give us an update.

      • Sheree
      • December 2, 2012
      Reply

      Hi Nicolina,
      I have been diagnosed with TV too. I’ve had it for about 5-6 months now. I have it on my neck and my face, from the cheekbones down. My TV is the opposite of yours, mine is dark pigmentation. I hate it! I am an African American female and I look like I have a (5 o’clock shadow) beard trying to grow in. It is so embarrassing. I am constantly applying a darker foundation from my cheeks up to match the darker pigmentation from my cheeks down. My foundation only lasts half the day, so everyday at noon I have to make a b-line straight to the bathroom with my makeup bag in tow. I’ve gone to the dermatologist. I tried the chemical peels, done the citric acid oils on my skin. I use the ketranozol shampoo (I’m pretty sure I didnt spell that correctly.) I have used the various creams and ointments that he’s given me and I still have the same condition. I have started using Mederma for the darkend pigmentation on my skin and that seems to work, I am noticing the spots getting lighter. But, if I stop using it for awhile I notice the darkness returning. I read on another site to try Saprox. It’s suppose to be a healthy product or treatment. I haven’t used it yet but I am willing to give it a try. They say you can get it at Amazon.com or some health food stores. I’m willing to just about try anything… Even this diet that leaves you with almost nothing to eat. I am an admitted chocoholic, what am I to do? Well here’s what I am going to do… I’m going to try the Saprox first and if I have to, my last result will be the DIET 🙁 s

        • admin
        • December 3, 2012
        Reply

        Hi Sheree…thanks for your comment.

        Have you tried a pyrithione zinc based product like Noble Formula Soap? It is safe to use on your face and any part of your body.
        The link here will take you to a “customer-review”.

        And…who doesn’t like chocolate?

    • Suhail
    • July 31, 2012
    Reply

    This is the 3rd consecutive year I am suffering with TV. I apply a Shampoo labeled as Candid TV. And thank God, it works. I however had no idea about the prescried diet for TV. Now will try to follow as much as possible. Thanks very much sir.

      • Tony
      • August 1, 2012
      Reply

      Thank you Suhail.

    • Best Diet
    • July 15, 2012
    Reply

    Terrific! I’ve been searching for this information , thanks for posting, Best Diet.

      • Tony
      • July 15, 2012
      Reply

      Thank you for visiting and comments.

    • Antonia
    • July 14, 2012
    Reply

    It might be some truth to this madness because when I was pregnant I threw up so much and I notice the whole nine months my skin cleared up from TV and even the dark spot where gone…I guess it came from me not being about to keep down the food listed above accept milk. But I couldn’t eat fruit, bread, etc. So only a smart person would cont. the diet.

      • Tony
      • July 14, 2012
      Reply

      Hi Antonia.
      You make a very interesting case.
      I wonder if during pregnancy, the changes in a person’s hormonal and immune systems effect their Tinea Versicolor?
      This is a good question for our Guest Doctor.

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