Vitamins That Treat Tinea Versicolor

Vitamins That Treat Tinea Versicolor

Tinea Versicolor is a superficial fungal skin infection that can be mistaken for other types of common rashes. This infection occurs when two types of yeast that are present in the skin’s normal flora become pathogenic; these pathogenic forms are caused by factors such as pregnancy, Cushing’s disease, removal of the adrenal gland, burns, malnutrition, a suppressed immune system, excess heat, excess humidity, steroid therapy and oral contraceptives.

Anyone can get Tinea Versicolor, but it usually occurs when sebaceous glands are most active, which is during early adulthood. It is also more frequent in tropical and sub-tropical climates.

Symptoms of Tinea Versicolor

  • Oval or irregular pale, dark tan or pink spots with a diameter of ¼ to 1 inch that sometimes merge to form a larger patch; redness can increase when sufferer is overheated.
  • Occasional skin scaling, which is fine and ash-like.
  • Mild itchiness.
  • Sharp borders on spots.
  • Possibly re-occurring whenever the weather gets warm or sufferer sweats excessively.

Hypo-pigmentation, or the appearance of pale spots on the skin occurs because the pathogenic yeast produces a chemical that disables the body’s melanocytes, meaning that the production of melanin, the pigment responsible for skin color in humans, decreases dramatically.

Hyper-pigmentation, or the redness of the spots, is usually caused by the skin’s inflammatory response.

Treatment

There are various topical treatments available that a doctor will prescribe; because the fungus is on the skin’s topmost, superficial layer, topical anti-fungal treatments work well. However, in severe cases, oral medication may be required. In most cases, once the fungus has been eradicated, the hypo-pigmentation will persist for several weeks or even months; this is because the melanocytes need time to start producing melanin once more. This means that although the infection is cured, the white blotches on the skin remain and the uneven color of skin may cause distress.

While there are many references that list vitamins that treat Tinea Versicolor, the effectiveness of these claims when used alone is unsubstantiated. In any case, it is always best to speak with your doctor before starting any type of treatment. What you can do however, is use easily found vitamin supplements to help increase melanin production so that your skin pigmentation recovers faster.

Natural treatment

Tinea Versicolor can be caused by malnutrition and vitamin deficiencies. One of the best things you can do to prevent or improve the condition is eat a healthy, balanced diet or take vitamin supplements; in fact, there are some vitamins that can help regulate melanin production so that the hypo-pigmented spots typical of Tinea Versicolor disappear faster.

One of the first steps a person should take for overall good health is eat an abundance of fresh fruit and vegetables that are high in vitamins that boost the immune system and contain anti-oxidants. Dark, leafy green vegetables, citrus fruits, grapes, tomatoes, and red and orange bell peppers are all great sources of vitamins A, C, and E and are also anti-oxidant powerhouses.

The next thing a person can do is take some vitamins that target melanin production and skin repair.

Vitamins that target melanin production and skin repair

Vitamin B12 regulates melanin production; in cases where a person has a vitamin B12 deficiency, cutaneous skin lesions don’t heal with conventional methods and hyper-pigmentation can result. B12 is found in meat; vegetarians or others who have difficulty absorbing vitamin B12 from their everyday diet should consider taking an oral supplement.

Vitamin C is important for collagen production; furthermore, it’s responsible for keeping your skin tone bright. It also contains tyrosinase inhibitors, which prevents your skin from producing too much melanin in response to an injury.

Vitamin A can treat skin that is blotchy in color; it can even out your skin tone. It has retinoic acid which evens out slight discolorations in pigment that can result from Tinea Versicolor.

Vitamin E is an anti-oxidant that protects and repairs skin. It can help prevent premature aging and scarring, so it’s a good idea to include it in your diet or take a supplement.

Dosage

According to the website herbs2000.com, the following dosages are appropriate for treating Tinea Versicolor:

Vitamin A: 25 000 IU, decrease to 10 000 IU after six months (avoid vitamin A during pregnancy)
Vitamin B complex (including B12): 50 mg, three times a day
Vitamin C with bioflavenoids: 1000 mg per day
Vitamin E with mixed tocopherols: 400 IU

Vitamin A and E oil-free creams could be applied topically to the affected area as well to minimize scarring and to speed up the skin’s repair process.

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Comments

    • Okafor Chukwuebuka
    • June 23, 2017
    Reply

    I live in Nigeria, and the temperature is very high, I was diagnosed with TV two years ago, and I have taken both oral medicines, and skin creams, but the discoloration did not go. I also was advised to use nizoral shampoo and cream, but it never worked. I need help fast because it’s spreading everywhere and always makes me feel uncomfortable and embarrassed when I take off my shirt in public.

    • Danni
    • September 29, 2016
    Reply

    Hi, I’ve found the following recipe on the net for treating TV:
    Ingredients: honey, olive oil, bees wax.
    Proportions: 1:1:1
    Preparation: Bees wax slowly melted in the olive oil on a low temperatures, then honey added.
    Used 3 times daily on the affected areas for 3+ weeks.
    Has anybody actually tried this? Thx

      • Tony
      • October 1, 2016
      Reply

      Hi Danni.

      That is a new one for me.
      Let me know if you try it, and what type of results you see.

    • Martha
    • July 2, 2016
    Reply

    I’ve had TV for several years now. I’ve been reading comments in here and you folks seem to have the rashes (red) that sometimes itch. Mine are white spots that are very noticeable on my upper arms and lower legs! I’ve tried several things that don’t help. I swim frequently in a salt-water pool. I’m really self-conscience but I hate to wear tops with longer sleeves because the temp here is frequently over 100! There are so many suggestions, where do I start?

      • Maanvi
      • August 24, 2016
      Reply

      Apply aloe vera gel (preferably fresh) once or twice a day or use baking soda ( as a scrub). Another possible solution is to apply tea tree oil ( diluted with oil) if you do not have very sensitive skin. I’ve had TV for months now and I’ve been been using these 3 remedies to treat it. It has helped a lot and I hope it’ll help you.

    • Mel
    • May 23, 2016
    Reply

    Hi all, don’t know if I have TV …did not see doc to get diagnosis but I sure had some kind of red itchy dry scaly fungal infection – confirmed by pharmacist after 5 weeks. It is very manageable now. The rashes were on my neck and lower eyelids-super ugly and itchy. At first I thought it was eczema as the patches were dry and red so I treated with eczema medication. Cover myself with oily creams and lotions – Big mistake!!! The fungus loves moisture and there worsened. So during the last week I have use topical fungal medication and wash my face and neck with mild soap and water and allow to air dry. No creams, moisturizers and sunscreen!!! And it’s 99% clear. Last two nights I have been rinsing affected areas with diluted distilled vinegar too – google it- kind of kills the fungus. Below are other tips…all the best!

    Here are some tips to help you manage tinea versicolor:

    Avoid using oily skin products.
    Reduce your exposure to the sun. Exposure to the sun may trigger or worsen an episode, and a tan makes the rash more visible.
    If you have to go out in the sun, consider using an anti-fungal shampoo daily for a couple of days prior to sun exposure.
    Put on sunscreen every day. Use a non-greasy formula with a minimum sun protection factor (SPF) of 30.
    Do not wear tight clothing.
    Wear breathable fabrics, such as cotton, to decrease sweating.

      • Alex
      • January 24, 2017
      Reply

      Sunshine (natural Vitamin D of the Sun) is actually very healing for the body, and for your skin. Of course, avoid sunburn, but expose your naked skin to the sun everyday for 15-20 minutes if possible.

        • Tony
        • January 26, 2017
        Reply

        Hi Alex. Thanks for your comment.

        I think exposing yourself to the sun as you suggest is best once you have the fungus under control, to regain your natural skin complexion.

    • Gjypsy
    • March 3, 2016
    Reply

    I have had tinea versicolor for years. Since I was in High School 9 years ago. I lived in New York when I first got it never went away in the winter. I’m so happy to find all these at home remedies, although a lot haven’t worked for me. I have it on my legs, arms, back, stomach. Its horrible but I’m eager to try more remedies!

    • Sara
    • November 3, 2015
    Reply

    I am so glad I found this website. I have had TV for 5 1/2 years. It developed while I was pregnant with my son. I went to 4 different doctors before one finally sent me to a dermatologist. The other Drs kept telling me, it will go away as soon as your son is born. Boy were they wrong. I have been trying to find ways to calm my TV. In 2014 is when I went to the dermatologist and I was given an oral prescription. I didn’t have a problem with TV for over 12 months, then a couple weeks ago it appeared again. I tried athletes foot cream because of the zinc, I have tried selsun blue, and baby d zinc cream. I didn’t think of trying the Aloe Vera or Coconut Oil. Thank you all for posting/commenting about how you deal with it, it has given me more options to try before I decide to go to the dr again.

      • Sherifa
      • December 17, 2015
      Reply

      Hi! I’ve had TV for the past few years also. It has come and gone, but for the past year, it got worst on my face. You said you went to the dermatologist in 2014..what tablet did they prescribe for you? Thank you!!

    • Mr. Mike
    • October 7, 2015
    Reply

    I’ve been suffering with TV since vietnam . I use tee tree oil soap every shower and cocunut oil rubbed all over after shower. Check it out yourself cocunut oil works

      • Tony
      • October 16, 2015
      Reply

      Thank you Mr. Mike.

        • Mandy Davis
        • August 8, 2017
        Reply

        My son is 13 and he has been diagnosed with TV. It’s on his face & body. He’s had it for about 3 weeks. I keep hearing contradicting remedies. He’s very active in Sports. He’s stressed about it and very embarrassed. Will the topical antifungal creams scar his face & how do I know if the fungus is gone if the white spots remain?

          • Tony
          • October 10, 2017
          Reply

          Hi Mandy. Thanks for contacting me.

          The topical creams, nor the skin condition itself will scar his skin.

          And once you have the rampant fungus under control, your son’s natural complexion will gradually return as he tans.

    • Jake
    • August 24, 2015
    Reply

    I’ve had TV for years now and have tried numerous ways to get rid of it. Nothing will get rid of it for good but the best, quickest, and cheapest treatment for this is Banana Boat SPF 50 suntan lotion for kids. Make sure that its the one with Ingredients – Titanium Dioxide 3.1% and Zinc Oxide 4.0% because they make a few different types.

    I’m almost certain its the Zinc that knocks it out. Use this at least once a day but twice is better and it’ll be gone within 3 days to 1 week. Hope this helps 🙂

      • Tony
      • August 25, 2015
      Reply

      Hi Jake. Thanks for your testimony.

      This is the second time in 2 weeks that someone has recommended the exact same product for their Tinea Versicolor.
      See a comment by SV in Tinea Versicolor and Your Diet.

      • victor tran
      • October 27, 2015
      Reply

      is it sunblock or suntan lotion?

    • mike smith
    • August 20, 2015
    Reply

    Ive found the same as Gary, Old Spice [after-shave] kills it under my arms. Iv’e been told I have the worse case most docs have seen. Trying to find the correlation.
    Ingredients : alcohol denat, propylene glycol, sodium stearate, tetrasodium edta, yellow 10, green 5.

      • Tony
      • August 20, 2015
      Reply

      Hi Mike. Thanks for your input.

      I truly don’t know how to comment, other than say I’m happy you found something that works for you.

      Has anybody else tried Old Spice After-Shave for their Tinea Versicolor?

        • Danni
        • September 29, 2016
        Reply

        My dad uses some sort of after-shave on his back and also gets very good results. I wonder what might be the reason, but as long as it works, it’s fine.

    • Jeffrey
    • May 31, 2015
    Reply

    I have been struggling with TV ever since I got appendicitis. I was put on iv-antibiotics on two separate occasions.
    I didn’t realize the TV as it was on my chest where my skin normally begins to lighten. My situation is bad as I moved from NY (relatively dry) to SW Florida, and I now pave asphalt for a living. This leads to a sweat filled day and going home with clothes DRENCHED in sweat all year long. Long story short, I have made a concoction that has been working faster than anything else I’ve tried and I may suggest it to anyone dealing with TV.

    Firstly, invest in an aloe vera plant. I made a moisturizer that contains the following: aloe vera gel, coconut oil, tea tree oil, vitamin-E oil with keratin, neem oil, half a lemon (juice), and essential oil of choice for scent. I blend this up in my nutri-bullet and use it after I shower.
    I also shower with neem soap and within 1 day some areas of the rash vanished and the large rash areas are much less noticeable. Along with taking apple cider vinegar and aloe gel orally daily, I’m hoping I can get this to clear up in less than a week with a multi faceted approach internally and externally with different anti-fungals. Best of all its all natural. It leaves my skin baby soft, and best of all, neem oil is a natural bug repellent…so no mosquito bites. I suggest it to everyone.
    I refrigerate it until I’m about to shower then I put the container in warm water to turn it back to a liquid then apply immediately after shower. I hope others try this as it has been a godsend. Thanks for your info.

      • Tony
      • June 2, 2015
      Reply

      Thanks for your suggestions Jeffrey.

      I like the fact that these ingredients would serve well to moisturize the skin. Until I found the Terrasil products, I found that most Tinea Versicolor treatments would leave my skin feeling very dry.

        • Jeffrey
        • June 3, 2015
        Reply

        Another thing that people may not realize can irritate their condition is chlorine in the water. Here in SW Florida, we have hard water. It would dry out my skin and I couldn’t figure out why my skin was so dry after a shower, which was aggravating my skin condition. The concoction leaves my skin softer than anything I have ever used. I hope it helps others save some money and beat their condition because its embarrassing and hurts self-esteem, for me at least.

    • Doris Barnes
    • March 22, 2015
    Reply

    Has anyone tried to use Echinacea in addition to a multivitamin? I know that Echinacea is used to promote immune health and was curious?

      • Tony
      • March 22, 2015
      Reply

      Hi Doris. Thanks for your question.

      I have pondered the same thing, but never actually tried it myself. Researching Echinacea suggests it would have no adverse effects on Tinea Versicolor…I cannot find any directly-related benefits.

      Still, it is a good question…comments anybody?

        • Andrew W.R.
        • May 4, 2015
        Reply

        Echinacea is an Immune Booster, therefor contraindicated with anything remotely autoimmune. Not that it would harm much, but long term use, is not traditional, or useful…as Immune “Boosting” is exhaustive (in general) beyond a normal period; say, just like running is good, but not 100% of the time.

        Echinacea will certainly create an antagonistic situation, with this condition, overall. Again, there would be no notable, or necessarily noticeable harm, but pointing in the direction of Immune “Normalizes” or Immune Nutrients that are considered “Boosters” but are not genuine Immune “Stimulants”.

    • kathleen dowdell
    • March 20, 2015
    Reply

    Just found out that I had TV and I receive medicine, but I will be trying other means to control the outbreak of TV. It was a small spot which I thought was dry skin at first but now it has
    begun to spread to shoulder, chest, and back of neck.

      • Tony
      • March 20, 2015
      Reply

      Hi Kathleen. Thanks for contacting me.

      I like your style, and encourage you to find what works best for you.
      Ingesting medicines for Tinea Versicolor are renown to harm internal organs. Many effective topical-alternatives exist.
      And for a more aggressive approach, you should consider your diet which might promote body fungus, and regularly sanitizing your laundry.
      Please keep in touch.

    • Erin
    • August 13, 2014
    Reply

    I use 100% tea tree oil; I saturate a cotton pad and wipe it directly on the area and it eradicates it. After the rash is gone, I moisturize by popping vitamin-e capsules and rubbing them into the skin. I got TV when I had strep throat and experienced severe sunburn due to the tetracycline med the doctor put me on; I had never seen anything like this. It took two months before the dermatologist could see me, at which point she did prescribe ketoconozole, but it wasn’t working quick enough for me. I have always kept tea tree and vitamin-e around because years ago I used it for scalp psoriasis and it eliminated it within days. That was after seeing 3 different dermatologist and trying all sorts of prescriptions. I swear by Thai stuff and hope it helps you all too!

      • Tony
      • August 20, 2014
      Reply

      Hi Erin…thanks for sharing with us.

    • Helen
    • April 18, 2014
    Reply

    Hello. I’ve read about TV on other sites and they mention no citric acid foods like strawberries, oranges or lemons or fermented or pickled foods.

      • Tony
      • April 20, 2014
      Reply

      Hi Helen. Thanks for contacting me.

      I will look into this and update my list as appropriate. Thanks for your input.

        • Jeffrey
        • May 31, 2015
        Reply

        I can’t agree as citric acid is alkaline forming in the body and with ascorbic acid ( vitamin c) its going to help your body. Fermented foods also help your friendly gut bacteria.

    • Ann
    • October 11, 2013
    Reply

    Diaper cream worked for me last outbreak, but now it’s back with a vengeance and insanely itchy! Thanks for all this info.

      • Tony
      • October 11, 2013
      Reply

      Hi Ann. Thanks for your comment.

      Wow…that’s a new one for me! I’ve never heard that before. Could you please reply back with which brand exactly. I wonder if the cream you used is high in zinc content. Zinc is a natural anti-microbial. Some forms of zinc such as pyrithione zinc, are a very effective anti-fungal.

    • Gary Myers
    • April 27, 2013
    Reply

    I know this will sound crazy; but, I have suffered from T.V. for decades … I’ve tried the prescriptions, I’ve used the ointments (like that purple goop terrasil). I take vitamins (all listed in your list, but not because of the T.V. … because of my age). I eat all sorts of fruits and veggies.

    On a whim, I spread my “Old Spice Deodorant” on my fungal areas on my shoulders, under my breasts and on my arms … VOILA! Within TWO DAYS the blemishes were eradicated! The moment I feel the slightest itch I apply the deodorant and it’s gone!!!

    I know it sounds crazy; but, IT WORKED FOR ME! T.V. GONE!

      • Tony
      • April 28, 2013
      Reply

      Gary…I don’t know what to say…other than I’m glad you found something that helps you.

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