tinea versicolor tattoo

Will Tinea Versicolor Scar My Skin?

Resolving Discolored Skin Patches.

Tammy in Wisconsin writes,”…I feel like I have some freakish tattoo on my skin! I feel literally branded and I’m worried I’m scarred for life!”

This must be a normal reaction, because regularly here at Tinea-Versicolor.net, people ask if the discoloration of skin is permanent, and whether they will ever look normal again?

The answer to the question is quite obvious once you understand what is actually causing your discolored skin…let’s get into it.

Everybody has fungus on their skin!

It’s pretty gruesome, but true…that normal healthy skin supports a whole ecosystem of micro-organisms living on its surface. Yeast, bacteria and fungus all co-exist and work with your body to keep a natural balance on each population.

Malassezia is the name of one of the fungi. When everything with the human body is working normally, this fungus goes about its existance without any special notice.

Everything was fine until I got TV!

It’s unsure exactly where the real blame lies, but some people have or develop an inbalance with their hormone or immune systems. And when external conditions are favorable such as higher levels of humidity and body oils, the Malassezia fungus on their skin begins to multiply at a rate that overcomes the body’s natural control of the micro-organisms on its surface.

This is the condition known as Tinea Versicolor (TV).

Understanding what makes our skin color.

Regardless of origin, all people’s skin color is made by a pigment in our skin called Melanin. When we tan, the sun’s rays simply influence more Melanin production in our skin.

Malassezia (the fungus responsible for Tinea Versicolor,) as it thrives produces an acid that inhibits the production of Melanin in the skin cells it comes into contact with, effectively shutting down the pigment in that area of the skin.

So what you see on your body as discoloration, is simply the contrasting areas of skin where the pigment production has been compromised and neighboring areas of skin that are normal.

This is why your patches and spots become more noticeable during summer when you tan!

Take back control and restore your skin!

Finally the answer to the question, “Is the discolored skin associated with Tinea Versicolor permanent?” should be clear.

In the process causing the condition of TV, NO skin cells are killed or damaged.

So once you begin to control the over-abundant fungus responsible, your skin will again produce the pigment to naturally restore the discoloration and normal appearance of your skin.

NO permanent damage, and NO scars or visible evidence will remain.

Keep this in mind.

Your aim to treat Tinea Versicolor and keep your skin looking healthy, should be to assist your body in maintaining a natural balance of skin surface conditions. Adopt a long term offensive against the over-active fungus and you will achieve visible results.

To learn a detailed approach to successfully combat TV, see the treatment page of our website.

Previous Post
Best Treatment For Tinea-Versicolor
Tinea Versicolor

Return Of A Favorite Tinea Versicolor Treatment.

Next Post
Tinea Versicolor and exercise
Tinea Versicolor

Tinea Versicolor: 5 Precautions To Take When Exercising.

Comments

    • Naomi
    • August 7, 2017
    Reply

    Hi,
    I recently started using terrasil anti-fungal ointment/ cleansing bar and I’m noticing some darker brown spots appearing on my skin and am a little concerned. My dermatologist is no help which is why I did my own research and turned to this treatment. Please let me know if this is something you’ve heard of. My spots have always been lighter than the rest of my skin (I’m pretty tan) and these spots are even darker brown than my actual skin. Thanks in advance!

      • Tony
      • October 10, 2017
      Reply

      Hi Naomi. Thanks for contacting me.

      I have not heard of the “spots” turning darker after using Terrasil products.

      Have you contacted Aidance Skincare directly?
      They have a fabulous after-sales policy.
      Here is their “Contact Us Page”.

      • Jen
      • October 22, 2017
      Reply

      I used JASON natural anti dandruff shampoo as a lotion every night for 2 weeks and my tv completely disappeared after years. I read about it on another site and tried it. I still use it as a shampoo. It’s brilliant

        • Tony
        • October 25, 2017
        Reply

        Hi Jen. Thanks for your comment.

        The salicylic acid (2%) found in the shampoo is helpful in controlling fungus.
        I have also used products with this ingredient, but found that it really dries my skin.
        Do you use a moisturizer afterwards?

    • Shalini
    • June 6, 2017
    Reply

    Hello, I first had it, under my lips in 2013, since then I I’ve been to various doctors, I have been treated wrong by most of them. They called it Melanosis. I have realized it now it is hyper-pigmented Tinea Versicolor. It gets back in summer every year. I live in a very hot and humid place.

    • Bryan
    • May 18, 2017
    Reply

    This article makes no sense and I don’t understand why you are contradicting yourself? First you say that it is absolutely not contagious then in the five steps you talk about bringing your own mat to the gym and protecting yourself using workout equipment. If it’s not contagious why would it matter?

      • Tony
      • October 10, 2017
      Reply

      Hi Bryan. Thanks for contacting me.

      The mat I suggest you take when exercising, is to reduce the amount sweat, dirt, and other fungus promoting ingredients that come in contact with your own body.

    • Charlotte Roberts
    • May 1, 2017
    Reply

    I have had a skin disease for over 13 years. It comes and goes. I have black marks all over my body. Nothing I do works, pills, oils, or creams. It itches. I have to stay covered up because I’m ashamed of how my skin looks. My arms, my legs, my back, every part of my body has scars and I live in the South. Very hot summers.

      • Tony
      • October 10, 2017
      Reply

      Hi Charlotte. Thanks for contacting me.

      Have you seen a dermatologist for a diagnosis?

    • em
    • December 4, 2016
    Reply

    I have had it for 4 years now and just starting treatment. The spots are very tiny but will it ever go away? I know it will come back every once in a while but will my skin ever be the way it was again, if I use the treatment?

      • Tony
      • December 5, 2016
      Reply

      Hi Em. Thanks for contacting me.

      YES…your skin will recover, if you take a very disciplined approach to treating your Tinea Versicolor.
      Remember, the “maintenance routine” that is ongoing…is vitally important as the initial “silver-bullet” attack on the fungus.
      And take it to the next level when you include adjustments in your diet and laundry habits for a power-packed offensive.

    • A.J
    • November 11, 2016
    Reply

    I have tried almost all the treatments out there for my tinea versicolor!.. Nothing seems to bring my skintone back. The white spots are still there and I never see any tone to the spots.
    The spots are on my neck and my cheeks.

    I have tried ketoconozole pills. Followed the treatment to the end twice now and the spots have not even budged. I use 2% miconazole cream twice a day and still nothing. I am convinced that tinea versicolor does not go away. I am scarred for life so it seems.

    I do not understand why dermatologists are not honest about this condition. They all say “try this cream and/or these pills” it will go away. We all know that is not true. So now what? …There has to be something out there that will get rid of it. Knowing what I know and seeing the poor results from the products and pills that we are all told to use I tend to think that the information about this condition is all wrong. Maybe doctors have no clue on how to treat it..that’s my personal thought. Sorry to sound like a hater but I am very much at my wits end about this.

      • Tony
      • November 12, 2016
      Reply

      Hi A.J. Thanks for contacting me.

      I certainly “feel you”.
      I would like to point out, that Tinea Versicolor does NOT go away…but it can be managed.
      By consistently utilizing a “maintenance routine“, you will control the fungus and eventually restore your skin complexion.

      Don’t give up.

      • Diamond Green
      • December 4, 2016
      Reply

      Hi, sorry to read this but coconut oil restored my skin color back. Try it and let me know! Good luck

        • mak
        • February 7, 2017
        Reply

        Surprisingly, virgin coconut oil is an amazing alternative to lotion. I use it for oral health. I did oral intake but quit due to digestion…you know it’s still oil.

        I have tinea versicolor for 6 years already (body and face), but I just do it occasionally or when I have this [body problem] motivation (boys just don’t care).
        Since the age of 26 I tried to find a cure, but after 6 years my face is back to normal. I don’t do it too much in my body, but I think I need to.
        Also, since I don’t apply lotion or soap regularly, it’s still visible but far from what I saw before. Now I will do it full time.

    • puja
    • October 24, 2016
    Reply

    I got Tinea Versicolar only on my face….my doc (not dermatologist) said its T.V.
    …I really doubt whether it is vitiligo…I’m getting depressed day by day.

    • Em
    • October 13, 2016
    Reply

    I was diagnosed with TV in August. I was prescribed ketoconazole cream that I have been using since. I was also given an oral medication that was only needed for two weeks. I also have been using selsun blue and nizoral shampoo.

    I was not going to the gym anymore, but when I went to my follow-up appointment at my dermatologist, he said the fungus was dead and I was safe to work out again. I did notice a few spots went away before working out, but since I have been working out again they appeared very quickly and look bad.

    It is affecting my life very badly and making me very depressed. Is there anything more I can do to get rid of this? If the fungus is dead why am I getting more spots? What is the best method to get rid of this, I can no longer bare looking at these spots. It has deeply affected my life. I am aware to stay away from any food with yeast, but I need help trying to get rid of these horrible spots. Hope to hear from you soon

      • Tony
      • October 15, 2016
      Reply

      Hi Em. Thanks for contacting me.

      I certainly feel your frustration. But rest assured, you can improve the look of your skin dramatically. The key is relentless consistency in your approach to treat your skin. Or to phrase it another way, always be treating your skin.

      Start a photo journal of your problem areas.
      Follow a strict regimen on treating your skin.
      Consider how laundry and diet can aid you in your effort to restore your natural complexion.

      • harsh
      • October 18, 2016
      Reply

      How do your spots look? Are they white? What size?

      • Dana
      • December 25, 2016
      Reply

      Drinking aloe vera juice daily restores your PH, and you can also put it on your face. Lemon juice on affected area daily will kill the tv. Also, use a soap with tea tree oil in it. Pure Tea tree can also be used on the skin for this, but it’s a very strong smell.

    • Nassar
    • October 9, 2016
    Reply

    I had some success with steroids over the years, but was never explained side effects. It seemed to go 2-3 years before returning.

    Now in my 30s, I won’t be going that route. Last time I treated it with terbanafine tablets, but did not complete the course. I was told two months, I stopped after two weeks due to work and lifestyle. Again they faded in the background for a year. There but not visible. I simply leave it to the last minute.

    Couple of suggestion guys, to add to your particular program. If you have access to thermal/natural baths, then make use of them. Opt for baths. But if you have to shower, don’t shower for too long.

    • freshgg
    • September 22, 2016
    Reply

    I had hyperpigmentation AND blotchy skin – and really feel the Somaluxe Moisturizer is starting to make a difference. I am a 37 year old woman and have been very unhappy with my skin for quite awhile now. I have continued with daily use of the Somaluxe Moisturizer and my skin is looking so much brighter and fresher, I’ve even had a few compliments telling me I look healthier and fresh. My hyperpigmentation has started to break up a little bit, giving me little dotted about patches of normal skin tone, so I’m hoping a few more weeks down the line that it will more or less cleared up. Fingers crossed.

      • Tony
      • September 25, 2016
      Reply

      Hi Freshgg. Thanks for contacting me.

      Please keep me posted on your results.

    • Jackson H.
    • September 11, 2016
    Reply

    You state that tinea versicolor is due to a fungal infection inhibiting the production of melanin in the skin.
    I have a pale complexion and my Tinea Versicolor is a brownish tan color. I’m having a hard time understanding this relationship between the seemingly opposite effect it has on my skin. It’s pale in appearance on places in which I’m tanned and tan in appearance on places in which I’m untanned/pale.

    Also I’m having the most difficult time trying to get rid of it. I’ve used fungal creams and they only seem to be temporary. It always ultimately comes back. I also live in a seasonal climate, yet it doesn’t seem to ever go away even during winter…Is there something wrong with me? Why do I get it so extreme?

      • Tony
      • September 13, 2016
      Reply

      Hi Jackson. Thanks for contacting me.

      Tinea Versicolor gets its name due to the fact that symptoms vary in color. [Versi-color.]
      The appearance may be white, pink/red or tan/brown in color.

      The article states the inhibition in production of Melanin. This is specific to the lighter resulting skin color referred to as hypopigmentation.

      A more accurate description of events within our skin would state that the fungus produces a substance which can change the pigment in new skin cells.
      Darker versicolor, or hyperpigmentation, occurs when the fungus enlarges the pigment cells.
      Pink/red discoloration is due to mild inflammation of the skin.
      All three variants may coexist on the skin.

      Tinea Versicolor is renowned for its ability to return. I think a common mistake most people make is to believe the rash is gone when there is no physical evidence to the eye. I have made the same mistake many times in the past.

      Experience has taught me to keep up a maintenance regimen of anti-fungal soap and cream…consistently throughout the year. This is what works best for me.

        • harsh
        • September 29, 2016
        Reply

        I have white spots sized 8mm diameter on the extreme left of the chest. One in my inners thighs, one on my foot. Others are very small white spots. Also I have observed a few brown spots. A few days back I noticed a pale spot on my face near my nose. Is it Tinea versicolor?

          • Tony
          • October 1, 2016
          Reply

          Hi Harsh. Thanks for contacting me.

          My advice is to see a reputable dermatologist to get an accurate diagnosis.

            • Laura Hart
            • November 14, 2016

            Hi, my name is Laura. I just found out that I have Tinea Versicolor. An immediate care doctor said it was Vitiligo, without really looking at me. I thought she was wrong, as what I read online about Tinea Versicolor seemed more likely what was going on with me.

            I’m just using the cream Clotrimazole as a remedy for it. I just have this feeling that it’s not going to go away with just cream.
            This condition has made me super depressed.

            Do you think I should see a dermatologist rather than a family care doctor to get the exact proper diagnosis? I’m so worried all the time about this and get confused about what I read from everyone online. Please help! Thank you, LAURA

            • Tony
            • November 15, 2016

            Hi Laura. Thank you for contacting me.

            The short answer is YES…you absolutely should see a Dermatologist.

            A Dermatologist will take a painless skin scraping sample from an infected area of your body to observe under a microscope.
            Only after this type of examination will they provide you a diagnosis, and a prescription to follow.
            Sometimes they will also project a special light from an instrument called a Wood’s Lamp, to highlight the extent of the infection over your entire body.
            You should request this if you would like the data.

            I suggest you discuss the recurring nature of Tinea Versicolor with the Dermatologist, and formulate an appropriate long-term plan together.

            Please let me know how you make out.

      • Dana
      • December 25, 2016
      Reply

      Rub lemon juice on your skin every day, and drink aloe vera juice daily to restore your PH.

    • SPOTon
    • September 3, 2016
    Reply

    To keep this condition at bay and under control, it takes DAILY effort, good diet, and impeccable hygienic practices. When you look in the mirror and think…”oh god, it’s getting outa hand”…this is where you start THIS:

    1) Educate yourself on diet/supplements FOR this condition. Set your fridge/pantry/and cabinets up for proper diet and food choices during the counter-attack. Google: Tinea Versicolor dietary guidelines and helpful supplements. ( I’d list them, but TOO long and it pays to education yourself).

    2) Go buy dandruff shampoo and put it in your shower next to an exfoliator pad.

    3) If at ALL possible, go to the doctor and get a prescription for an antifungal pill. A ROUND of them. And extra for backup and maintenance.

    4) Check the weather and pinpoint a day you can re-tan your white spottiness.

    5) The DAY you start the regiment, wash EVERYTHING. Clothes, towels, sheets, vacuum, dust, and don’t shake anything out in the house. Wipe down whatever you sweated on with something that KILLS. Bleach. Vinegar. Whatever. I remember when I was a kid I could use the same towel for a week straight…but those days are over.

    Stuff in my Tinea Versicolor arsenal:

    Avalon Organics dandruff shampoo. Exfoliation pads. Bentonite Clay. Apple Cider Vinegar. Tea Tree Oil. Oregano Oil. Fresh Aloe plant in the backyard. Baking soda. Black walnut tincture. Diflucan. Herbal Tea. Supplements. Plenty of water. and……the bastard that started it all: MR. SUN!

    Take a LONG hot shower and exfoliate THOROUGHLY. I use my fingernails to scrape off dead top-layer skin cells to reveal the fresh layer below. I also scrub with a pad. Be careful not to rub the skin raw or scratch. NEVER REUSE the same scrub pads people…ever.
    So doing that removes the scaliness and dead cells and exposes the new skin under the spots. The MORE you expose the NEW layer of skin and exfoliate the dead cells, the MORE you’ll see this starting to fade out. You know you did a good job if, when you dry off, you scratch at a spot and it doesn’t flake at all. OK?

    TAKE the prescribed pills in the morning and don’t eat with it. Then immediately go exercise or do something that will make you sweat profusely. Ironically enough…going out for a sunbath will get you glistening, and will simultaneously re-pigment the newly exposed skin under each patchy spot.
    It may frighten you and you will have your moments of doubt…I do…but this is the only way to clean the slate as I say.

    Basic rule of thumb: the pills are to jumpstart the process, and the supplements are to MAINTAIN it because taking antifungal pills often will FRY YOUR LIVER.

    Use an organic sunblock so that your fresh white spotty skin doesn’t burn and peel. The tan comes on over TIME. Don”t be a fool and rush this. Just be happy that the appearance isn’t permanent. Keep in mind, it will ALWAYS come back. Show me the guy whose spots didn’t come back and I’ll punch him in his face!

    RECAP:
    Stick with the prescription to jumpstart, then revert ENTIRELY to organics and holistic approach with the supplements and topical treatments…because in the long-run…the body will do better with a clean regiment and your organs will last longer.
    The HARDEST part about this condition is mustering the energy to deal with it on a DAILY basis. That is no joke. We will be washing with dandruff shampoo, applying clay and tea tree oils, taking supplements and DAMNING sugary treats to hell for the rest of our lives. The ONLY reason my spots come back is because I get too lazy to tend to the prevention process. Simple as that.

    RE-recap:
    Pills to jumpstart. Exfoliate. Topical. Re-tan. Supplements. Diet. This is the gist of controlling a chronic unsightly spottiness.

    You’re Welcome.

      • Tony
      • September 4, 2016
      Reply

      Hi SPOTon.

      Thank you for your detailed comment.
      I am sure people will benefit from some of your suggestions.

      I think the take-away here is find what works for you, and stick with it!

    • Simran
    • August 31, 2016
    Reply

    Hi Tony .
    My name is Simran and I have the same problem of tinea. My skin is changing into brown color.

    • ali
    • August 15, 2016
    Reply

    I have had Tinea Versicolor for five years not knowing about it until a week ago. It was too late, because it spread all over my body with dark color in back, neck, stomach and more. Now I’m using sulphur soap, ketoconazole lotion and sodium thiosulphate lotion, but I don’t see much development. What should I do? I need to look normal again.

      • Tony
      • August 20, 2016
      Reply

      Hi Ali. Thanks for contacting me.

      The most effective solution for Tinea Versicolor is consistency and perseverance of treatment since it is renown for its ability to return.
      This is the best method to get the fungus under control. And once you get control, your skin will naturally restore its complexion.

      Concentrate your effort to fighting the fungus.

    • tanya
    • July 20, 2016
    Reply

    I got white patches only on face. I have tried many antifungal creams but its still spreading please suggest something.

      • Cj
      • August 25, 2016
      Reply

      Are u sure it’s tinea versicolor it may be vittiligo

    • Miguel
    • July 1, 2016
    Reply

    I have been living with Tinea Versicolor for two years now, since I first noticed it on my trip to Guanajuato Mexico and it won’t go away! I’ve tried everything, creams, shampoos and none of it works. I’m about to turn sixteen now and I’m very worried about my Tinea Versicolor. It’s covering almost my entire back, upper chest reaching to stomach, neck, and crawling on the side of my face and shoulders. I’m worried that this might affect my job applications in the future and the direction of my life.

      • Holly
      • August 1, 2016
      Reply

      Try using coconut oil, or tamanu oil mixed with a few drops of 100% oregano oil. Here’s what I do:

      Prepare the skin with raw, unfiltered apple cider vinegar (Bragg’s organic). Then put on your mixture of oils and let it sit. I usually put it on before bed, because it doesn’t have a great smell. I wish you luck, I know how difficult this is.

        • Tony
        • August 1, 2016
        Reply

        Thanks for the good advice Holly.

    • Charlene
    • June 26, 2016
    Reply

    Everything I have read about TV says that the discoloration is not permanent. I have tried the pills, the shampoos and the creams but after about 5 years the skin colour has not returned to normal at any point. The patches that were reddish returned to normal, but the patches that were lighter than my skin colour never returned. I can’t find any answers and it is frustrating! I’m scared to tan to try and get the skin colour back in case it just makes it more visible.

    • Scott
    • June 18, 2016
    Reply

    I have had TV since I was 15 yo. I’m now 35. I first noticed it from swimming in a filthy lake. Everyone has it present on skin but once it sets in and is visible then more than likely you will never get rid of it permanatly. I had several prescriptions (oral meds) and topical. All work to keep it visibly away but it always comes back. So I have at least concluded based on where you live and how your own body reacts to it that it is something that we have to live with forever and nothing will completely get rid of it. I get it sometimes so bad it turns into appearance of small mushrooms that raise up almost a centimeter from my skin surface. I scratch them off and apply salenium sulphide lotion to effected areas. Usually the fattier part of the body get it worse. I keep it at bay by an occasional treatment but when out mowing lawn in Midwest humidity and heat then it grows and spreads. For some of you that have tried and failed just understand it is not life threatening just a gross inconvienance. Good luck and those of you that are able to get rid of it then congrats because your biological make up is a little better than others.

    • judy
    • May 7, 2016
    Reply

    Hi, I had Tinea Versicolor back when I was a teenager. I got it when I moved to a very hot and humid climate. Had it for 5yrs not knowing what it was after plenty of Dr visits. I met someone in high school that had it , and they told me to use selsun blue or nizoral. I tried them with no avail. Then, I moved to Ohio. I don’t know if showering in different water, or living in a different climate changes things, but I got really sunburnt in the summer and after that it’s gone away completely. I had it on my chest, arms, back, and it was starting to climb up my neck. This was 7yrs ago, and it has not made a come back since. And I’ve also moved back to the hot and humid state I was living in when I first got it. Also after I peeled from that initial sunburn my skin color returned to normal, you couldn’t even tell I ever had it.
    Every person is different and reacts to treatment differently.

    I meet people all the time with “sunspots” and they don’t know what it is, so I’m glad to see there’s allot more information since 10yrs ago when I had it.

    I’ve recently gotten into essential oils, particularly tea tree, lavender, and clove oils. They’re fairly cheap, all natural, and kill everything in sight. I use them to clean house, disinfect laundry, and put a few drops in the bathwater, they smell great and promote your immune system…I’ve been reading that they also kill tinea versicolor along with other skin infections. My daughter had ringworm on her leg that I couldn’t get rid of for 2 months, it disappeared after I put lavender on it for 5 days.

    Just posting some all natural advice, if there’s anyone out there that’s against the overuse of prescription chemicals:)
    You have a great site, very informative on the subject at hand.

      • Tony
      • May 8, 2016
      Reply

      Thank you Judy for contacting me…and your kind comments.

      You have quite a story that I’m sure will resonate with visitors to this website.

      And I’m certainly with you on being against the overuse of prescription drugs.

        • Kyren
        • May 17, 2016
        Reply

        Hi. I had a skin fungus on my leg and used an anti-fungal cream to get rid of it. It worked but the infected area has turned white and is a different color to my normal skin. Will this patch ever return to normal and what can I do to speed up the process?

        • Doortje
        • June 17, 2016
        Reply

        Hi Tony, thank you so much for this good forum and answering all these questions.
        I got since 50 years small white ‘freckles’ on arms and legs and wasn’t bothered as I got also normal freckles and they do not itch. But now being 65 of age I suddenly got a fast growth in a few months time all over the body but not (yet) in my face. The skin is drier then ever, always been, and indeed very flaky.
        It could have to do with age as well as heavy stressful time I have been in. So immune system was not too great I suppose.
        I do not dare to take creams as they contain fat. I use Aloe Vera but that does not keep the skin from being that dry. Is scrubbing good? The products you are using are not known in Europe. Is there a similar make you know of?
        Every body gives you here in Holland and UK Selsun Blue with selenium sulfide in it.
        I do not know if it works as it will take so long before results will appear and on top of it the spot will keep on coming back I suppose.
        Your ‘therapy’ sounds like the best. Also the care for food, vitamins and laundry.

          • Tony
          • July 22, 2016
          Reply

          Hi Doortje. Thanks for contacting me.

          The products I recommend are available in Europe through Amazon…or directly from Aidance Skincare (England).

          Selsun Blue is somewhat effective to treat Tinea Versicolor, and very inconvenient with having to wait in the shower for the solution to dry on your skin.

          And finally, Tinea Versicolor is renown for its habit to return. I like to “maintain” my anti-fungal treatment even if I cannot see the discoloration on my skin.

    • A.J
    • April 23, 2016
    Reply

    I have had TV for years. I have discoloration on my cheeks, neck, ankles (half way up the leg) and back. I have been using anti-fungal creams non-stop. Nizerol body wash 2% solution. In the USA we only have 1% solutions which does nothing to TV. So as far as I am concerned Terrasil products do not work because they only contain 1% Clotrimazole. Don’t waste your money..I am going to use apple cider vinegar to try and get rid of my spots. Its so embarrassing it makes you feel like you want to hide. Living in California with the sun blazing everyday its kind of hard to conceal them and being so bright here the spots seem amplified! I have a feeling that the spots will never go away. I have not seen one person or have heard anyone on the TV forums that have gotten rid of the spots. So what does that tell you?

      • Tony
      • April 27, 2016
      Reply

      Hi A.J. Thanks for contacting me.

      Please let us know how you make out with Apple Cider Vinegar.

      • Amy
      • May 8, 2016
      Reply

      Apple cider vinegar (Braggs) straight to the spots. Let it sit for 10 minutes. Soak in tub, scrub with baking soda then apply coconut oil with tea tree and lavender. If you do it right before bed it soaks in all night. Your skin will be red after ACV but the mixture with coconut oil soothes it. It is the only thing that has worked and we have tried EVERYTHING!!

        • Tony
        • May 10, 2016
        Reply

        Thank you Amy.

        • Mary
        • June 6, 2016
        Reply

        Amy, did this really work? I am so embarrased by these spots. They seem to be multiplying rapidly. The dermatologist said they were sun spots and will never go away

        • Nathell
        • August 11, 2016
        Reply

        So are you soaking just in Apple Cider Vinegar or water too, and where can I get a mixture of oils so I mix myself?

          • Tony
          • August 12, 2016
          Reply

          Hi Nathell.

          For a list of beneficial moisturizers, please see my article Moisturizing Your Skin.

    • Mimo
    • March 22, 2016
    Reply

    Hi Tony,

    Please note I got TV on the year 2013. Whenever I am outside or feel any warmth, my body itches like crazy. It is not comfortable. Also advise on how can I prevent the TV from going to my face because currently it’s on my body only. I must say once again it’s very itchy.

    Regards

      • Tony
      • April 27, 2016
      Reply

      Hi Mimo. Thanks for contacting me.

      Please see my Tinea Versicolor Treatment page.
      I personally have spent many years perfecting what works best for me. Many people claim similar success once they consistently apply the information on that page.

      To really “pack a punch” against Tinea Versicolor, read also my articles on diet, and laundry.

    • Layla
    • March 17, 2016
    Reply

    Hi,
    I have never had any dry patches of skin or symptoms other than when I tan I have patches and polka dot patches of skin that don’t tan at all and stay very white. People laugh at me about it…

    It is on my trunk shoulders and back. I’ve tried multiple creams, shampoos and anti fungal tablets. But as soon at I tan the patches return…
    My General Practitioner referred me to a dermatologist who never examined me and informed me that in many cases the pigmentation does not return. It is just whether the body will or won’t.

    And that was that.
    I feel abandoned and let down. I won’t wear a bikini anymore and I’m only 25! I’ve had this for 12 years with no improvement. The thing that worries me most is I never had any ‘symptoms’ that have gone, I’m scared it will continue to get worse. I’m scared to tan at all and embarrassed about my body.

      • Tony
      • April 27, 2016
      Reply

      Hi Layla. Thanks for contacting me.

      Firstly, I believe you should see another Dermatologist. I really have trouble with what you described about your original experience.

      Next, it seems that some of the treatments you’ve tried have worked for you. Do you continue with these treatments in winter when you don’t have a tan?
      It may be that you simply require (what I call) a maintenance routine to keep up your body’s defense against fungus in preparation for the summer months.
      Tinea Versicolor is notorious for exactly the symptoms you describe. That is dormant in winter, and recurring in summer.

      Know this…it is controllable.

    • Alison
    • March 3, 2016
    Reply

    Hi Tony,

    I am very concerned about my skin condition. I have been battling tinea versicolor for about 12 years now. I have been using nizoral shampoo to control the condition and some years I have been forced to take anti-fungal pills with no results. How can you tell if the affected areas are hyperpigmented or hypopigmented? What remedies do you recommend. Some of my spots on my chest have been completely evened out, but my trunk is still very uneven and I have not been able to correct this for almost a year now. Please help!

      • Tony
      • March 6, 2016
      Reply

      Hi Alison. Thanks for contacting me.

      Hyper-pigmentation is when patches of skin become darker in color that normal surrounding skin. And hypo-pigmentation is the opposite, when patches of skin become lighter than normal.

      I have great success following the treatment method I describe. Have you tried any of my suggestions?

        • Audrey
        • March 28, 2016
        Reply

        Hi,

        I have suffered from TV for several years now constantly battling keeping the fungus off my skin. According to my dermatologist the overgrowth is controlled right now. My question now is what is the best and fastest way to even out my skin tone in the white patches? I have seen things that say to sun bathe and others that say to avoid it. Should I sun bathe, traditional sun or tanning bed? Or possibly try a professional spray tan or self tanner? Is there something that will cover or help me to even out? Thanks.

          • Tony
          • April 27, 2016
          Reply

          Hi Audrey. Thanks for contacting me.

          I like the natural approach of tanning by simply being outdoors. Vitamins can also help to restore your natural skin tone. (See my article: Vitamins That Treat TineaVersicolor.

          As for tanning beds…I believe you should take the same precautions as when you exercise, because of the fungus promoting environment in which you associate. (See my article: 5 Precautions To Take When Exercising.)

    • kiran
    • January 18, 2016
    Reply

    Pityriasis Versicolor can be cured? Can it leave my skin permanently?

      • Tony
      • January 25, 2016
      Reply

      Hi Kiran. Thanks for contacting me.

      Pityriasis Versicolor can be controlled…there is no cure. Regular treatment will help your skin achieve a natural healthy look.

    • sara
    • January 4, 2016
    Reply

    Hi and thanks you for your fantastic blog.
    I’m suffering from TV on my face, neck, back, and chest. Unfortunately I am also suffering from Melasma. This means my white patches are very noticeable in my face. I just ordered the Terrasil cream and soap and hope this will help me. My problem is that I can not get sun on my face since this makes me extreme blotchy. Will The white patches (they are big) go away without the help of the sun?
    I really hope so.
    Thanks again.
    Sara

      • Tony
      • January 13, 2016
      Reply

      Hi Sara. Thanks for contacting me.

      Tinea Versicolor and Melasma have different symptoms and remedies. Tinea Versicolor, once under control, will eventually fade without the help of the sun and your natural complexion will be restored.

      Melasma, is more effected by your hormonal levels. When your natural hormonal levels are restored, so will be your complexion.

        • sara
        • January 15, 2016
        Reply

        Thanks you for your reply. I’m using Terrasil Tinea now, and the soap. Do you recommend using it twice Daily? My skin feels so dry.
        And how long does one usually use the creams.
        Thanks again.

          • Tony
          • January 15, 2016
          Reply

          Hi Sara.

          I recommend once per day…first showering with the soap to cleanse your skin, and then apply the Terrasil Tinea cream.

          Also, I strongly suggest you inherit an on-going routine to combat the notorious nature of Tinea Versicolor recurring.

          Please see my article Treatment of Tinea Versicolor.

    • Anne
    • June 13, 2015
    Reply

    Hi! I have a couple questions on TV, and I’m kind of hopeless at this point so if you could help me. I have TV all over my back. My back looks discolored and spotty all over. I absolutely hate it. I took medication for it last year, but took it too late and was unable to sunbathe and even out my skin tone. This year I made an effort to really get my TV under control. I went to a doctor in April and he prescribed me 200mg of Ketoconazole for 7 days. I took it and I figured all was well. I assumed the spots weren’t fading because I hadn’t been in the sun to even my back out. I’m going on vacation in a week to Miami (=lots and lots of sun). I’m wondering if there’s anyway I would know if the TV is completely gone. I’ve never noticed that my TV ever itched, or “scaled”. And I believe it’s always looked the same. The same light skin tone-ish spots on my medium skin toned back. So basically my TV is looking the same as far as “symptons” and looks go. Or I just didn’t pay close enough attention a few years ago when the condition first appeared. So how am I able to tell if it’s gone if I never seemed to have the TV symptoms? I’m thinking maybe I did scale or itch, I just can’t remember. Can you have TV without it scaling and itching? Can discoloration be the only symptom of TV? I know that if I go and sunbathe right now I would be able to tell, because the spots would stay the same and the skin around it would get a lot darker. But I would really prefer not to because it would be really hard to even that out, and it would make it EVEN more noticeable which is exactly what I don’t want. I know I seem paranoid. But it’s my biggest insecurity. I’m hesitant to take another refill of my prescription because I’ve just now realized that Ketoconazole is actually a very high risk drug. It’s supposed to be used as a last resort solution. And I don’t know why my doctor would prescribe something that’s not FDA approves for TV.

      • Tony
      • June 15, 2015
      Reply

      Hi Anne. Thanks for contacting me.

      The only way to tell (scientifically) if you have Tinea Versicolor(TV) is by asking a Dermatologist to perform a skin-scraping and observation by microscope. A Wood’s Lamp test would reveal the extent of the fungus over your body.

      Unfortunately TV is notorious for it’s return. A 7 day coarse of medication will not cure this infection. Nothing will.

      The best treatment is long-term management, whereby you establish a routine that gives you control over the fungus. The good thing is that taking control is not difficult…just tedious. And your natural skin tone is NOT damaged in any way. Once you get the fungus under control, your skin will naturally restore itself.

      See my article on Treating Tinea Versicolor.

        • Fe
        • April 11, 2016
        Reply

        I have the same exact situation. Went to a dermatologist and she said there was no fungus there. Maybe there was before and she diagnosed me for tinea. But months later, the spots are still there and I’m afraid once I go I’m the sun it will get worse 🙁 so tired of it.

          • Tony
          • April 27, 2016
          Reply

          Hi Fe. Thanks for your comment.

          Having the “all clear” from your dermatologist is a very enviable position. Congratulations.
          Did your Doctor mention the recurring nature of Tinea Versicolor?

          I would suggest adopting a management strategy to keep your skin clear of fungus, and mitigate the chances of a repeat breakout.
          And…enjoy summer.

      • Melissa
      • September 1, 2015
      Reply

      I feel just like you. I moved to Hawaii a year ago to enjoy being outside and in a bikini. The body I work hard for is hidden because of tv. It is all over my back and down my right arm. I use prescription cream twice a day and there is no change. It’s very depressing.

    • Elizabeth
    • June 12, 2015
    Reply

    Hi Tony,
    How effective was the oral intake of Terbinafine? My doctor just prescribed it but after researching online, apparently oral terbinafine isn’t effective on tinea versicolor?? Hope I just didnt waste my money…
    Thanks,
    Elizabeth

      • Tony
      • June 15, 2015
      Reply

      Hi Elizabeth. Thanks for contacting me.

      I have never taken Terbinafine orally, only topically such as with Lamisil AT spray. The spray proved itself quite effective for me in my treatment for Tinea Versicolor and was my standard until I discovered more effective products.

    • Justine
    • April 12, 2015
    Reply

    Hi Tony, I started to notice having TV about 2 months ago. At first I didn’t take it seriously but as months pass by, my TV gets worse. Up to that point I was unsure if it really was TV. Then about 4 days ago I visited my dermatologist and confirmed that I have a TV. I am worried because it is on my face (cheeks). I started using the anti-fungal soap and the topical cream that she recommended to me. My problem is how do I know if the infection is already gone? How long does is usually take to re-pigment my skin? BTW I am a fair-skinned man. Slightly tanned so the white spots are really obvious. Please help me remove my white spots as quickly as possible because it really embarrasses me. Thanks for the help and reply!

      • Tony
      • April 12, 2015
      Reply

      Hi Justine. Thanks for contacting me.

      The good news is you made the best start by consulting a Dermatologist…I applaud you for that.
      More good news…Tinea Versicolor is controllable. But be aware that treatment is best when executed over the long-haul. This means that even when it appears your skin is better, do not stop a continued routine of anti-fungal maintenance.

      As for the white spots…as you start to control the out-break of fungus on your body, your natural skin-tone will return. No permanent damage is caused by Tinea Versicolor.
      Read my article

    • Anonymous
    • March 18, 2015
    Reply

    Hey there 🙁 I’m 14 and I have had tinea versicolor since I was 9, so about 5 years? I naturally have beautiful tanned skin! But I have bleached white spots all over my chest, stomach, back, neck and behind my knee caps. When it first showed up I noticed blotchy spots on my forehead but they never spread anywhere else. Since I was ten, I was using Pevaryl cream and Pevaryl showering solution. It would completely clear my tinea but sadly about 6 months later would re occur. I started using anti dandruff shampoos hoping for a permanent cure, but of course after months and months did not see one bit of progress! It upsets me because I have to dress like an old lady, where girls my age are wearing tank tops and I can’t :/….I am unmotivated and refuse to go to the shops or look in the mirror. I feel like my whole life revolves around this..:/ I’m starting to give up hope and think maybe I should just let it take over my skin. You are still beautiful if you have tinea versicolor, but sadly I don’t think I am.

      • Tony
      • March 20, 2015
      Reply

      Hi Anonymous. Thanks for contacting me.

      I know too well what you are going through, and how you feel…but please don’t give up! There are far more effective methods of treating Tinea Versicolor which you should try.
      And the real key to treatment is an on-going maintenance routine. This is very important!

      Please see my personal Tinea Versicolor treatment routine.

    • Dee
    • November 15, 2014
    Reply

    Hi… I have been dealing with TV for a few years now. It comes and goes and I’ve learned to accept that. But recently within the past couple of weeks my whole back and chest and stomach is covered in white spots 🙁 I went to derm and she gave me an anti fungal called fluconozole and I’ve been using ketaconozole cream every day and showering with selsun. My spots are still there after 2 weeks and I am worried they are permanent. They have barely faded. Yes, I do have tanned skin as I live in AZ, but I am worried the spots are “bleaching” my real skin color. Could this be possible? If not, how long does it take for everything to even out?

      • Tony
      • November 16, 2014
      Reply

      Hi Dee. Thanks for contacting me.

      Let me start by assuring you, your skin is not bleached or scarred in any way. Your natural complexion will be completely restored once your get control of the situation with your skin.

      I am often asked, “How long before the spots go away?”
      This is an impossible question to answer since everybody’s physiology is different, and external influences vary. But there are a few things you can do to assist the process:

      1. Be sure to utilize an effective method of treatment for your skin. This treatment must target the repeating nature of Tinea Versicolor.
      Rather than use the anti-fungals you mentioned which really dried-out my skin (I wonder if this is similar to your bleaching?) I much prefer the Aidance Skincare products I refer to in my article: Treatment of Tinea Versicolor.

      2. Take measures to restore the melanin in your skin which produces your natural skin complexion.
      The products I use made by Aidance have ingredients which do this. After years of trial-and-error research, I finally found a solution that blends this critical attribute in the same jar.
      Otherwise you could take vitamins A, B12, C and E which are beneficial to your skin. Read my article: Vitamins That Treat Tinea Versicolor.

        • jessica
        • January 23, 2015
        Reply

        Aidance Skincare DOES work! They have a jar just for Tinea Versicolor!

          • Tony
          • January 24, 2015
          Reply

          Hi Jessica. Thank you for contacting me.

          It’s very encouraging to get this type of feedback.
          I personally am delighted with the results I get from Aidance Skincare products.

          And a steadily growing number of readers to this website concur.

    • R
    • November 8, 2014
    Reply

    Hello,
    I have had tinea versicolor since 2009 only on my face. It first started with two white spots on both sides of the face. Then I started seeing a dark area next to the white areas. It is only on the sides of my face (a white patch and a dark patch next to it). I have started using TVT by Elk Haven Herbals to cure it.
    I was wondering how I would know when the infection is gone…when the discoloration is still there? Also, how do we get rid of the dark patches once the infection is gone? Will they just disappear on their own? Thank you.

      • Tony
      • November 10, 2014
      Reply

      Hi R. Thanks for contacting me.

      Firstly, you can only hope to correct the discoloration of your skin once you have the fungus infection under control and diminishing. This is because the over-abundant fungus is responsible for changes in your skin’s melanin, which makes up your natural skin complexion.

      Once you have reached this stage of control, the darker discoloration will heal by itself gradually with time, while the lighter patches heal with sun exposure.

        • R
        • November 10, 2014
        Reply

        Thanks for the reply. But I was wondering how we will know the infection is gone when the discoloration still exists.
        Also, do you know how long it might take the dark patches to go away?
        Thanks.

          • Tony
          • November 16, 2014
          Reply

          R…there is no easy way to know whether the infection has completely gone. You could ask your Dermatologist to pass a Wood’s-lamp over your body which would make the extent of the infection obvious.

          I find the best approach is to assume this condition is ever present. I put my faith in a treatment with proven results and make it a life-style.

          Follow the directions closely for the products you trust and use. Be sure to include a strategy to address the recurring nature of Tinea Versicolor. When you follow an effective coarse of treatment, your skin will restore itself.
          As for when…there are too many variables that can influence this. But be assured your discoloration is not permanent.

      • Sanjana
      • January 4, 2016
      Reply

      Hi R,

      I have the exact same problem (only on my face) and my patches have been around for 5 months. Did you find an effective solution to manage it? any help will be greatly appreciated.

    • Shannon
    • September 27, 2014
    Reply

    Hi!

    I moved to Hawaii recently and that’s when I first started seeing the white spots on my back. It started with two, and then the next thing I knew they were popping up all over my back, neck, and now my arms and chest. I went to the doctor and got some terbinafine anti-fungal cream and was told to put it on twice a day for two weeks. So I’m thinking that putting the cream on makes the fungus go away but not the actual spots? If that is the case how do I get the spots to go away? Can I wait two weeks for the cream to make the fungus go away and then start tanning so the spots blend in with the rest of my skin? I’m very tan and it would take forever to get all of my skin to fade to the color of the spots! Please help, thanks!

      • Tony
      • September 29, 2014
      Reply

      Hi Shannon. Thanks for contacting me.

      You are right in thinking that you must address the fungus problem first, before you will see any improvement to your complexion. The fungus associated with Tinea Versicolor inhibits melanin production. And unfortunately, restoring levels of melanin is a slow process. Please see the following posts to help you further:
      Vitamins That Treat Tinea Versicolor

      Please be aware that after the initial 2 weeks of using the anti-fungal cream prescribed by your doctor, you should adopt a maintenance routine that will enable you to manage your skin condition over time. Tinea Versicolor is infamous for it’s return!

    • Catherine
    • August 29, 2014
    Reply

    Hi Tony, thanks so much for your website and info but there’s one thing I have to ask. I see a lot of people have lighter color spots, but I have both light spots AND dark. The dark spots are all over my belly, neck, underarms and chest. When checking some old summer photos of me it seems I had light spots on my arms over a year ago, but no dark spots anywhere. I have been using selenium sulfide, then ketoconazole from my dermatologist for about a month now. Are dark spots harder to treat than light ones in your opinion? Also, my dermatologist ran a light over my body and saw nothing a few days ago, and prescribed a pill and body wash. Is this more a melanin issue now for me than Tinea Versicolor? Is it possible I have two different skin conditions at once? Are the light spots and the dark spots something else?

    Sincerely,

    Freaking out (lol)

      • Tony
      • August 30, 2014
      Reply

      Hi Catherine. Thanks for contacting me.

      Tinea Versicolor can cause both hyper-pigmentation (darker areas,) and hypo-pigmentation (lighter areas,) by influencing more or less (respectively,) production of melanin in the skin…though usually not on the same person.
      Hyper-pigmentation may be caused by a number of things from hormonal changes to allergic reaction.
      Frankly, I am alarmed your Dermatologist prescribed drugs without providing a detailed diagnosis. I personally would get a second opinion.

        • Lorraine
        • September 30, 2014
        Reply

        Hey tony. So I’ve had tinea versicolor for about 3 years already. My doctors have prescribed ketoconazole. I have applied it to my skin but it’s causing my skin to be dry and I don’t know what I can do to make it go away soon because I have a lot of events in high school and I don’t want it anymore. Is there a quick treatment or can it be helped any time soon?

          • Tony
          • September 30, 2014
          Reply

          Hi Lorraine. Thanks for contacting me.

          Dryness of skin is a very common side-effect of anti-fungals due to the coincidental removal of essential body oils. I also struggled to keep my skin moisturized without inadvertently causing another break-out.
          Very recently I discovered Aidance Skincare, a company that addresses the dryness issue by combining an effective anti-fungal with a number of natural ingredients that work to moisturize and heal the skin in many ways. For the passed 2 weeks, I have been using 2 of their products: Terrasil Tinea Treatment MAX and Terrasil Anti-Fungal Medicated Cleansing Bar with stellar results. I will be publishing my full review shortly.

    • johnny
    • August 4, 2014
    Reply

    I’ve had tinea versicolor for as long as I can remember. I never knew what it was. Recently I got around to treating it. My tinea versicolor is gone but there are still light spots where the infection use to be. I feel like a freak of nature and I’m very uncomfortable with my arms. How do i get rid of these light spots?

      • Tony
      • August 20, 2014
      Reply

      Hi Johnny. Thanks for contacting me.

      When you have Tinea Versicolor (TV,) under controll, you will be able to tan naturally and restore your skin complexion. Be sure to keep up the good work, as TV is relentless and very prone to re-occur.
      See also my article on vitamins that treat TV.

    • Fadhly
    • May 19, 2014
    Reply

    Hi, I have brown skin, and am having this hypo-pigmentation area over the trunk and stomach area, definitely Tinea Versicolor. I’ve been treated with ketonazole, the spot currently no longer scaly, but not sure the fungus has gone or not, the discoloration been there for almost a year, but no active symptoms like itchiness. Help me to get rid the spot…thanks.

      • Tony
      • June 1, 2014
      Reply

      Hi Fadhly. Thanks for contacting me.

      Reading between the lines, it sounds like you’ve seen a dermatologist…good!

      Restoration of your natural skin tone tone takes time, and only when you have the natural balance of fungus maintained on your skin. So my suggestion is to implement and follow the maintenance routine as set out in my treatment article.

      Additionally, try my suggestions for promoting the melanin in your skin.

      • Arsi
      • August 6, 2015
      Reply

      Hi Tony. First of all, I have to say that I have had TV for about 3 years. At first everybody thought they were acne scars. But after I saw a profess he said that it’s TV. Well I did the treatment all the way and I have used sulfur soap also for the treatment. I have a question. I have a really bad habit showering with extreme hot water. I don’t know why. Is it bad what I’m doing, and can it be the cause of my failure to treat the TV? Thanks.

        • Tony
        • August 12, 2015
        Reply

        Hi Arsi. Thanks for contacting me.

        I have never heard of hot water diminishing the effectiveness of a Tinea Versicolor treatment. I would expect hot water to open the skin pores and facilitate deep penetration, as well as better dissolving and washing away contaminants.

        I would think that the cause of your treatment failure may be the particular products you employ. There are far better products to use on your skin than sulfur soap.

    • Amy
    • May 5, 2014
    Reply

    Hi,

    So my doctor gave me Ketoconazole shampoo which I have been using. My concern is I am getting married in August and I only started treating it in April. I thought it was just dry skin so I was putting more lotion on it and it just kept spreading all over my arms. So I’m treating it now, and I will get the vitamins, but is there anything else I should do? Leave the shampoo on longer than 10 minutes? Exfoliate the skin? I want to be tanned for my wedding but I don’t want the spots to stand out even more. I read somewhere apple cider vinegar? I will take all the help I can get. Thank you.

      • Tony
      • May 6, 2014
      Reply

      Hi Amy. Thanks for contacting me.

      Treating Tinea Versicolor should be a multi-faceted approach. The more you can do to stack the odds in your favor…the better. Here is a list to dramatically improve your odds of success:

      1. My personal treatment for Tinea Versicolor.
      2. Consider what you eat my be feeding your infection.
      3. Sanitizing your laundry boosts your chances of success.
      4. Exfoliating for Tinea Versicolor.
      5. Vitamins to restore your natural skin tone.
      6. Top 5 mistakes most people make.
      7. Moisturizing your skin the right way.

    • Becky
    • April 2, 2014
    Reply

    Hi. I recently went to the doctors about a week and a half ago as I developed a rash over my body. The rash is a spotty rash and it is itchy. It is red although it sometimes appears like a white color, almost a bit like blistery. It is on my neck, stomach, thigh and arms. I used to go to sunbeds although I stopped I am quite tanned. The doctor prescribed me with ketopine 2 percent shampoo to apply once daily. My spots aren’t that bumpy anymore but they seem to have gone really white compared to my body, almost like they have scarred. Now all over my stomach it looks like I have loads of white spots but they are really noticeable and still slightly bumpy… Do you think it’s actually TV? I don’t want to be applying ketopine if it isn’t doing any good. Thank you. Any help would be appreciated.

      • Tony
      • May 6, 2014
      Reply

      Hi Becky, and thanks for contacting me.

      Your comment was directed to my Spam folder and I have only now discovered it.

      Tinea Versicolor does not change color during treatment as you’ve described. I would suggest you see a qualified dermatologist for a diagnosis of your skin condition who will observe a simple skin scraping under a microscope, and utilizing a Wood’s lamp to determine the extent of infection over your body.

      Ketopine is a generic brand containing Ketoconazol, a broad anti-fungal agent used in many topical skin treatments. You should discuss your concerns with the dermatologist.

    • Steve
    • March 29, 2014
    Reply

    Hi Tony, I don’t know if you still answer questions here but thought I should give it a shot… I got TV about 3 weeks ago, got diagnosed and started medicating about a week ago (ketoconazole 400 mg/day) I think its gone now cause its no longer scaly. The discoloration (hypo-pigmentation) is what bothers me… I wouldn’t have minded but its really conspicuous on my neck region (my girlfriend hates it!) Please, what’s the fastest way to get skin pigmentation back to normal. Will tanning help? I have to go to school so people are going to see whether I like it or not. Any answers would be greatly appreciated.

      • Tony
      • March 29, 2014
      Reply

      Hi Steve. Thanks for contacting me.

      Tanning helps only once you have the melanin levels restored in your skin…otherwise your darkened skin will further exaggerate the hypo-pigmentation.

      I have had good feedback from people who have taken vitamins to boost their melanin production as I set out in a post titled Vitamins that treat Tinea Versicolor.

      Most important is that you understand the recurring nature of Tinea Versicolor, and you adopt a routine to treat your skin even if you think it has gone.

        • Cindy
        • May 1, 2014
        Reply

        Hi Tony,

        I have recently been tanning, both on a bed and outside. Recently, my skin has been itching and definitely has tinea versicolor.

        Will my skin go back to its normal color if I follow the steps in the treatment?

        Thank you

          • Tony
          • May 6, 2014
          Reply

          Hi Cindy. Thanks for contacting me.

          I have absolute conviction you will dramatically improve your chances of a favorable outcome in controlling Tinea Versicolor by following a regimen as in the treatment page.

    • Jayne
    • January 23, 2014
    Reply

    Hello. I have had these red blotches for a few weeks. First started as little patch on top of thigh, then spread.
    On arms, legs, feet and little on the back. These blotches are almost perfect biggish circle. A Doctor said eczema. I went back to see another Doctor and said TV. I am really scared as some websites say there is a serious underlying problem and shampoos and creams will not work so I’m really confused..
    I also suffer with a B12 deficiency and have regular blood tests and injection if required. But on a lighter note, since using shampoo Ketopine 2% for 3 days it does not look as angry.
    So my real question is, can these blotches also be slightly raised like a swell or completely flat, and is it life threatening?
    Please help me to understand and not be scared …
    Thanks for any advice.

      • Tony
      • January 24, 2014
      Reply

      Hi Jayne. Thanks for contacting me.

      With so many facets to your condition, you really should consult a dermatologist.

      Common symptoms of Tinea Versicolor do not include raised circular red swells, and the infection is definitely not life threatening.
      The Ketopine shampoo you used contains ketoconazole. This is an effective treatment for a number of fungus and yeast infections which explains why your skin may have appeared better.

    • Joseph
    • July 24, 2013
    Reply

    Hello,
    I was 14 when I first got Tinea Versicolor about 2 years ago on my stomach and back. This is when it was the worst; itchy nights and they went scaly now and again so I got treatment. My doctor prescribed Ketoconazole 2% to apply all over my body once a week and Betamethasone o.1% to apply on affected areas every night. It cleared up pretty quickly and within about 2 months it was gone, but I still had 3 or 4 scars on my back that kind of looked like bruises but wouldn’t go away. I continued to with my prescription until it ran out which was about 1 month after it had gone. All was fine except for those few scars on my back but 6 months later it came back again. I decided to not use Ketoconazole because it was a nuisance applying all over my body but just applied the beta cream on it and it went away the following day. My problem is my scars will they go away? I have 1 on my torso which is bright like its been scarred and then I have scars on my back that look like small bruises (1 shade darker than my skin), and when I got it the second round I got 1 minor scar on my leg. Compared to others cases of Tinea Versicolor it’s not much of a big deal but it really pisses me off. I have a toned and tan body but I don’t want to show my legs or torso because of the marks. Right now, I haven’t really been doing anything to get rid of the marks just applying beta cream every-time Tinea Versicolor comes up, no proper regime. Should I start using Ketoconazole again, will it make the marks go away?

      • Tony
      • July 26, 2013
      Reply

      Hi Joseph. Thanks for contacting me.

      I’m concerned about what you call “bruises”. I can only advise you to see a doctor.

      But let me assure you, Tinea Versicolor does no permanent damage to the skin. It’s symptoms are completely manageable and reversible. And at your young age, it is most likely to be with you for many years.

      Unfortunately, there is no cure…no magic-bullet that can knock it out. So I would encourage you to find a solution to treat your skin other than with drugs that have inherent side-effects. I personally prefer natural remedies. And I personally follow a routine that successfully maintains my skin looking and feeling healthy. You can see my routine on treating Tinea Versicolor here.

    • Wafa
    • June 23, 2013
    Reply

    Hello,

    I discovered I have Tinea Versicolor recently, and I am shocked that it is all over my body (while I never noticed,) on my chest, back, hands and foot. I went crazy because I never knew it was there and the spots on my back (down) thought its just something that will go away. My skin color prevented me from noticing it and now I just want it to go away soon. I use Ketoconazole 2% shampoo for the second day now and I wonder if I should apply an anti-fungal cream too? I also want to know if using a lotion on effected areas will delay or effect treatment. The shampoo leaves my skin very dry and a bit itchy when previously it was not at all!

      • Tony
      • June 26, 2013
      Reply

      Hi Wafa. Thanks for contacting me.

      Ketoconazole is an anti-fungal [synthetic.] So additionally using a cream is unnecessary.

      In the past, I used Ketoconazole also but I could not tolerate standing in the shower for 15 minutes, and the associated dryness and itching. There are more gentle and effective products available which I use today.

      As for “lotion”…check the ingredients for fungus promoting substances like certain essential oils.

    • Hamza
    • June 19, 2013
    Reply

    Hi…I have TV since December 2012… it started from a very little patch in my left hand… and now it is spread to the whole back of both hands and also 50% of the face…it is summer season and my real skin tone is brownish and that is getting more tan in sunlight.. I am worried that my TV seems to get worse…everybody can notice white patches on my skin now…I am using shampoo and multivitamins… also did 10 days oral intake of terbinafine month ago…and fluconazole week ago…
    Guide me about when will my skin get evenly toned again. What will help it in this recovery…tips???
    I am treating TV with the help of a doctor about 2 and half months ago…also tell me about my treatment quality…

      • Tony
      • June 19, 2013
      Reply

      Hi Hamza. Thanks for contacting me.

      I would suggest you get the opinion of another Doctor…(a Dermatologist,) if you are dissatisfied with the events and results of your present professional.

      Also, read my reply-post to Shelby (dated also today,) for affirmative actions you can take immediately against TV.

        • Hamza
        • June 26, 2013
        Reply

        Thanks Tony….pale white patches on my hands are turning to the original color near the roots of the hairs on the back of my hand…is it normal? Am I recovering?

        I have been using all those vitamins about 28 days now…also advise me whether I should continue taking them or should I take a break afterwards…Thanks…

          • Tony
          • June 27, 2013
          Reply

          Hi Hamza.

          It sounds like you are having success. Congratulations.

          Given the reoccurring nature of Tinea Versicolor I would suggest continuing the vitamins and your treatment. You should notify your doctor and obtain his opinion.

      • Elizabeth
      • June 11, 2015
      Reply

      Hi Hazma,

      How effective was the oral intake of Terbinafine? My doctor just prescribed it but after researching online, apparently oral terbinafine isn’t effective on tinea versicolor?? Hope I just didnt waste my money…
      Thanks,
      Elizabeth

    • Shelby
    • June 19, 2013
    Reply

    Hello! I got tinea versicolor in April of 2011 after I started using a greasy cocoa butter ointment on my stretch marks. My dermatologist recommended that I use Selsun Blue shampoo and use twice daily for 1-2 weeks or until the blotches disappeared. (Rash only occurred on my stomach thankfully!)
    The spots did disappear after about 2 weeks of treatment but since the condition is chronic, I continued to lather up my stomach once or twice a month to keep it from coming back. From July of 2011 until June of 2013, I had no problems with the condition. No itching, flaking, redness, raised skin, nothing!
    The skin on my stomach is very pale. Always covered up with clothing and not exposed to sun like other areas of my body. Honestly until a couple days ago I had completely forgotten about my tinea versicolor because it never caused any problems for me. I’ve never been in a tanning bed or anything like that to make it obvious.
    I used some tanning lotion on my skin 3 days ago which I feel was a BIG mistake. How could I be so stupid? I have read over and over that the spots do not tan…. but there were no spots so I went ahead and put on some instant tanning lotion. I had no idea my skin was still doing this to me!
    I know that the infection is not there because I have treated it and taken all precautionary measures to keep it from coming back like I am supposed to. My guess is that the spots I am seeing (the ones that did not tan) are the areas that were infected previously that never regained pigment.
    Since I am usually pale, I am assuming that these areas just blend in with my pale skin tone so I don’t realize they are there. I would like to know if this is possible and if so, how can I get my skin to return to normal? I feel like this is permanent! I don’t know what to do all I want is an even complexion. I would like to tan and have an even skin tone but I am scared to death to do it, let alone apply any kind of lotion to my skin.(any kind of lotion application leaves my skin red and blotchy and suspiciously looks like it will develop into tinea versicolor but I shampoo right away and skin returns to normal.) Any tips on how I can get pigment back to these spots? I have considered trying a new diet to balance out the yeast in my system but I don’t know where to start. Since my last breakout I’ve tossed the cocoa butter, tanning lotion, everything into the trash and have been exfoliating my skin. Also in a last ditch attempt to lift the fake tan off my skin, I found myself lathering baking soda and lemon juice on my skin to buff out the tan and reveal healthy skin cells below. Please help and thanks for reading!

      • Tony
      • June 19, 2013
      Reply

      Hi Shelby…and thanks for contacting me with such a detailed report.

      Let me assure you the discoloration of your skin is not permanent. Pigment producing cells are dramatically inhibited by secretions from the rampant fungus on your body. And once the hyper-production of fungus is stemmed, the original level of pigment will be restored and your natural color renewed.

      I have heard good reports from people who take vitamins A, B12, C and E to assist their body recover natural levels of pigment. I would suggest you consider undertaking the same steps, along with a continued anti-fungal body wash regimen. See my post Vitamins That Treat Tinea Versicolor.

      I’m glad you are thinking of limiting your diet of fungus promoting foods…have you also considered sanitizing your laundry? All these things combined would give you the most powerful arsenal against Tinea Versicolor.

    • Amber
    • April 22, 2013
    Reply

    I Also currently have tv. And my question is when it starts to like scab over … does that mean that the treatment the doctor gave me is working and its going away? And also how long does it take for the color to go back to normal?

      • Tony
      • April 24, 2013
      Reply

      Hi Amber…thanks for contacting me.

      I’m unsure what you mean by “scab over”…and concerned! I think it best to ask this question to your doctor.

      As for your natural color returning once you have the fungus under control, there are vitamins such as A, B12, C and E that will target melanin production in your skin and speed up the process. See my blog post Vitamins That Treat Tinea Versicolor.

    • Alex
    • April 16, 2013
    Reply

    Hello,
    I have tinea and have for a while. I use dandruff shampoo sometimes. I got a large area that was up near
    my shoulder around my armpit and the skin has exfoliated. It was really deep, A lot of thick skin dots fell off.
    However, it has left what looks to be scars. I know
    what “versicolor” means, It has left an area that is darker not lighter on my skin. My question, so you don’t get confused is: If left untreated, will tinea versicolor permeate the skin to a depth that will leave scaring after it is treated? more than the versicolor trait of the fungus, which can be darker or lighter, which will “tan/exfoliate” back to normal…? Please establish that a versicolor spot is NOT A SCAR, because it can “tan/exfoliate”. I am asking about a 3year old colony on my shoulder that went deep into my skin, Lets not misuse the word scar, do I have a scar? If tinea eats through your skin what does it look like after it heals, “I assume that there will be versicolor, but will there be a scar? Thanks in advance for any advice!

      • Tony
      • April 17, 2013
      Reply

      Hi Alex…and thanks for contacting me.

      The answer is absolutely NO. Tinea Versicolor will not scar your skin in any way as it does not harm skin cells…it simply shuts down pigment producing melanin which comes into contact with the fungus. And since melanin is constantly being produced by your body, your natural skin appearance will be restored once you get the fungus under control.

        • rohit
        • February 15, 2014
        Reply

        I first had tinea versicolor 2 yrs ago. I didn’t know what it was, so I didn’t treat it. But surprisingly it healed without any treatment. I repeat, without any treatment. But a few months ago it reoccurred on my stomach portion. I visited to my doctor and she said it was tv. She prescribed for me kezole tablets, selenium sulfide shampoo and crematozole cream but it seems not to be working. What can I do?

          • Tony
          • February 28, 2014
          Reply

          Hi Rohit. Thanks for contacting me.

          I think you have 2 options here:

          1. Re-visit your doctor and discuss the situation further with her.

          2. Start a very disciplined regimen similar to which I detail on the treatment page, and keep an accurate journal of any action you take and results observed.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *